KCET Primetime Highlights in Honor of Women's History Month

 KCET PRIMETIME HIGHLIGHTS

IN HONOR OF WOMEN'S HISTORY MONTH

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On-Air Picks of the Week: WEEK OF FEBRUARY 27 - MARCH 5, 2011

In honor of Women's History Month KCET offers two documentaries on Tuesday, March 1: Veiled Voices from 9:00 PM-10:00 PM investigates the world of Muslim women religious leaders through the eyes of three women in Lebanon, Syria, and Egypt; and Virginia Lee Burton: A Sense of Place from 10:00 PM- 11:00 PM, which celebrates the career of groundbreaking author-illustrator Virginia Lee Burton.

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2011

9:00-10:00 PM

 VEILED VOICES

 Description/Listing:

Women across the Arab world are redefining their role as leaders in Islam. Veiled Voices investigates the world of Muslim women religious leaders through the eyes of three women in Lebanon, Syria, and Egypt. Shot over the course of two years, Veiled Voices reveals a world 

Veiled Voices

rarely documented, exploring both the public and private lives of these women. The stories feature in the film give insight into how Muslim women are now increasingly willing to challenge the status quo from within their religion, promoting Islam as a powerful force for positive transformation in the world. Each triumphs over difficult challenges as they carve out a space to lead- both in Islam and in their communities. Veiled Voices profiles three influential women- along with their families and the communities they serve: Ghina Hammoud in Lebanon, Dr. Su'ad Saleh in Egypt, and Huda al-Habash in Syria.

TUESDAY, MARCH 1, 2011

10:00-11:00 PM

VIRGINIA LEE BURTON: A SENSE OF PLACE

Description/Listing:

Virginia Lee Burton: A Sense of Place celebrates the career of Virginia Lee Burton (1909-1968), the groundbreaking author-illustrator of the beloved picture books Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel and the Caldecott Award-Winning The Little House. This finely wrought documentary explores Burton's life and art through a treasure-trove of archival materials, never-before-seen photographs, personal documents, sketchbooks, original manuscripts, and interviews with family, friends and scholars. Virginia Lee Burton: A Sense of Place paints a portrait of a Renaissance woman ahead of her time, whose art and literature remains an enduring part of America's cultural heritage.

On-Air Picks of the Week: WEEK OF MARCH 6 - MARCH 12, 2011

As part of its celebration of Women's History Month, KCET offers two documentaries on Tuesday, March 8: The World of Julia Peterkin: Cheating the Stillness, which tells the story of the Pulitzer Prize winning author who won praise for her sensitive portrayal of rural African Americans during the 1920s. Then Boyfriends, from 10:00-11:00 p.m., follows five teenage girls from different backgrounds as they experience the joys and sorrows of romantic relationships. On Saturday, March 12, from 7:00-10:00 p.m., also in honor of Women's History Month, KCET joins with community partner Interval House to present Telling Amy's Story, hosted by Mariska Hargitay (of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit).  

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

9:00 - 10:00 PM

THE WORLD OF JULIA PETERKIN: CHEATING THE STILLNESS

Description/Listing:

This one-hour documentary chronicles the controversial life of author Julia Peterkin, a Pulitzer 

Julia Peterkin

Prize winner for her sensitive portrayal of rural African Americans of the 1920's. Hailed by W.E.B. Du Bois for her "eye and ear to see beauty and hear truth," this white plantation mistress shattered stereotypes of race and gender before she inexplicably stopped writing at the height of her career.

TUESDAY, MARCH 8, 2011

10:00 - 11:00 PM

BOYFRIENDS

Description/Listing:

For one hour, viewers go inside the world of five teenage girls from North Texas as they navigate the joys and sorrows of their romantic relationships over the course of one year. The young women featured in the documentary openly discuss their hopes and fears, choices of sex or abstinence, dependence and independence and their dreams for the future. They may hail from different economic, cultural and ethnic backgrounds, yet their stories share a striking commonality.

EVENT UPDATE: 

Also on March 8, the KCET Cinema Series feature is the National Geographic Film "Desert Flower," the stirring autobiography of Waris Dirie, a Somalian nomad circumcised at the age of three and sold into marriage at 13. After fleeing Africa, she went on to become a supermodel on the world's stage. Now, at 38, she is a U.N. spokesperson against female circumcision. The film stars Liya Kebede and Sally Hawkins. A Q&A with star Liya Kebede follows the screening. The spring KCET Cinema Series takes place at the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences in North Hollywood. For ticket prices and to charge reservations by phone, please call 323-953-5800. Evening begins at 7:00 p.m.

SATURDAY, MARCH 12

7:00 - 10:00 PM

TELLING AMY'S STORY

Description/Listing

In honor of Women's History Month, KCET joins with community partner Interval House to present Telling Amy's Story, hosted by Mariska Hargitay (of Law and Order: Special Victims Unit). The film follows detective Deirdri Fishel as she pieces together seemingly disparate clues that ultimately might have prevented one woman's tragic homicide- clues that offer insight into how to recognize the often-hidden world of domestic violence. The night will also feature graduates of Interval House's intervention program as they share their own stories of triumph over domestic violence. 

On-Air Picks of the Week: WEEK OF MARCH 13 - MARCH 19, 2011

In honor of Women's History Month KCET offers two documentaries on Tuesday, March 15: Fannie's Last Supper from 9:00 PM-10:00 PM, which explores how culinary expert Fannie Farmer sowed the seeds of the modern food revolution; and Eating Alaska from 10:00 PM - 11:00 PM, a film portraying a wry quest for safe, healthy, meaningful and sustainable food that leads to climbing mountains with women hunters and an exploration of how Alaskans eat.

TUESDAY, MARCH 15

9:00 - 8:30 PM

FANNIE'S LAST SUPPER

Description/Listing

Fannie's Last Supper reveals the origins of American cooking and explores how the culinary expert Fannie Farmer sowed the seeds of the modern food revolution. The America's Test 

Fannie's Last Supper

Kitchen team recreates a 12-course feast straight from the pages of Fannie Farmer's 1896 best-seller, Boston Cooking School Cookbook. A dozen food and media mavens, including Harry Smith,,Renee Montagne, Jose Andres, Mark Bittman and Amy Dickinson gather at Chris Kimball's restored 1859 townhouse to judge the results. Fannie's Last Supper also reaches back into the history of cookware, cooking and the food industry to understand how Victorians shopped, cooked, ate and entertained. The documentary also details the culinary sleuthing and testing necessary to bring back to life the original Fannie Farmer recipes and cooking methods. Recipes include: homemade jellies, Mandarin cake, venison, roast geese and lobster a l'Americaine.

TUESDAY, MARCH 15

10:00 - 11:00 PM

EATING ALASKA

Description/Listing

This serious and humorous film is about connecting to where you live and eating locally. It is about trying to break away from the industrial food system when that means not only buying fresh seasonal food from local farmers, but taking part in a world of hunting and gathering. Made by a former city dweller now living on an island in Alaska and married to fisherman and deer hunter, it is a journey into regional food traditions, our connection to the wilderness and to what we put into our mouths. The film portrays a wry quest for safe, healthy, meaningful, and sustainable food that leads to climbing mountains with women hunters, scrutinizing food labels with kids, talking moose meat with teens in a small village public school and exploring how others in the last frontier, Alaska Natives and non-Natives, are eating.

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