Storm Expected to Bring Snow to Sierra-Nevada Mountains

Snow at Devils Postpile National Monument | Photo Courtesy NPSSkiing does not officially begin at Mammoth Mountain or Lake Tahoe until November, but the first snow of the season has arrived, and more is coming.

As seen in this photo, Reds Meadow in Devils Postpile National Monument received a light dusting this morning. A few miles up the road at Mammoth Lakes, a number of photos of heavier snow have surfaced on Twitter. Further up north at Lake Tahoe, Slope Dope blogger for the San Francisco Chronicle Al Saracevic today let out a "Woot! Woot!" when posting a photo of an incoming storm coming over the Sierra-Nevadas.

John Urdi, Executive Director for Mammoth Lakes Tourism, said this week's snow tease will be a good momentum boost for the upcoming season. Of a more immediate note, with a sunny weekend expected, he explained that with the possibility of snowcapped mountains and the already-changing color of leaves, that it could be picture perfect for photos. "It's probably going to be just spectacular," he said.

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The change in leaf color throughout the Eastern Sierra began to shift into high gear in late September, notes to the California Fall Color blog. Some areas peaked last week, but many are in progress.

The early winter storm could bring 20 inches of snow to the high country, with 6 to 12 inches down to 7,000 feet elevation, according to the National Weather Service. The heaviest snow will fall during the day on Wednesday. Other areas expected to be affected include Sequoia National Park and Forest, including areas in the southern portion of the mountain range in Giant Sequoia National Monument.

Some places like Devils Postpile are predicting temporary closures to areas and roads. "Likely, the closures will be short lived, as warmer, drier weather is expected to move into the area on Friday," read a notice posted at the National Monument's website. "It may, however, take a while for the road to melt and be deemed safe for visitor travel."

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About the Author

Zach Behrens is KCETLink's Editor-in-Chief of Blogs, where he oversees website editorial and advises on projects. When he does write, he mostly covers local government, environment, and the outdoors.
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