Proposition 2012 Cheat Sheet: California's Nov. 6 Election

ELECTION NIGHT RESULTS: Click here to get results for all California Propositions and other races and click here for our Prop Winners and Losers Cheat Sheet.


With an unusually high number (and variety) of ballot measures qualified for the general election on November 6, voters will be making some fairly momentous decisions, including whether to abolish the death penalty in California, deciding among competing strategies to close the budget gap, and revising the state's Three Strikes Law. To help you make sense of it all, we've put together a series of proposition cheat sheets, complete with summary and analysis, campaign finance data, and the original text of each measure.

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Prop 30: Jerry Brown's Tax Proposal
Gov. Jerry Brown's tax measure would temporarily increase taxes for the richest Californians to help close the budget gap, with money for schools and local public safety programs.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Latest news and stories about Prop 30
  • Prop 31: State Budget Process
    Prop 31 would introduce a two-year budget cycle, place limits on the state legislature's ability to tax and spend, and give local government greater control over public programs.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 32: Political Contributions
    Prop 32 would make three key changes to California's campaign finance rules, including one that could seriously impact the way unions raise money for political funding.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 33: Auto Insurance Rates
    Prop 33 would allow insurance companies to offer a "continuous coverage" discount to new customers who already have coverage elsewhere.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 34: Death Penalty Repeal
    Say goodbye to the Death Penalty in California if this proposition gets a majority yes-vote from voters.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 35: Human Trafficking/Sex Offender
    Prop 35 would introduce much stiffer penalties for convicted sex and labor traffickers, in addition to expanding the definition of human trafficking.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 36: Three Strikes Law
    Prop 36 would amend California's Three Strikes Law to shorten the sentencing for some nonviolent offenders.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 37: Genetically Modified Foods
    Supporters want to label food that contains genetically engineered material to give consumers more knowledge and choices about what they eat.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 38: Molly Munger's Tax Proposal
    Prop 38 would raise the income tax rate on most Californians to help pay for schools and pay down the state's hefty education bond debt.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Latest news and stories on Prop 38
  • Prop 39: Multistate Business Tax
    Prop 39 would change the way multistate businesses pay taxes in California. The increased revenues would benefit schools and help pay for clean energy retrofitting and alternative energy programs in California.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Read the text
  • Prop 40: Redistricting
    Prop 40 is a referendum on California's newly redrawn state Senate districts, but the original proponents are no longer seeking to reject them.

  • Cheat Sheet: Summary and analysis
  • See who's funding both sides
  • Top Photo: Dawn Endico/Flickr/Creative Commons License

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    Capital Recap: More Big Money Flows Into Props for Auto Insurance, Payroll Contributions, GMO Labeling, and Munger's Tax

    LEAVE A COMMENT Leave Comment  

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    Review of props means an approval, contribution, higher living costs, pay offs to watch dogs, committees, startup expenses, ind fund raisers, and prior promises on loans that must be paid off. Since approval is dedicated to projects, extended needs, future or updated expansions, keeping supported programs, no matter what additional funds are received from other resources, are we the only people that cannot say NO? Having to do without is what many of us do everyday, so whose needs are we providing for?

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    California's system is certainly controversial and could stand to be improved! The League of Women Voters is conducting a study of the Initiative and Referendum process in our state. You might want to read the materials we're providing, for more information about the history, impact, and ideas for reform: http://ca.lwv.org/study/initiative-and-referendum-0

    If you're very excited, we welcome women and men to join the League and participate in our studies. We're a grassroots organization committed to active and informed civic participation.

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    Wonderful election guide!

    If you'd like to add video, the League of Women Voters of California Education Fund and the Cal Channel created short videos about the propositions which you are welcome to link to.

    http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2MQciBDLVxznkWDqE0GJmoW61u1ar4HT

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    The proposition system is ill-conceived to be sure, but we are stuck with it, so each voter needs to get well-educated and then go out and vote. For in-depth, non-partisan, analysis of all of the Cal. State Props check out http://politomuse.wordpress.com/propositions-nov-2012/.