Segment | Politics

Power Politics

Nowhere was the elation over Barack Obama’s victory greater than in the black communities of South Los Angeles. Not only was an African-American elected president, but the whole campaign has re-energized the political hopes of black politicians. But Obama’s election may have been foreshadowed 35 years ago right here, when Tom Bradley became the first black mayor of a major American city.

Footage was provided courtesy of THE NEW LOS ANGELES. THE NEW LOS ANGELES was produced by Lyn Goldfarb, who is currently in production on a new documentary about Tom Bradley.

RELATED RESOURCES:
UCLA School of Public Affairs
UCLA Center for the Study of Race, Ethnicity, and Politics
The Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies
National Association of Latino Elected & Appointed Officials

LEAVE A COMMENT Leave Comment  

You guys tried not to go there but this is still Black on Brown battle royale, part 3782. I read somewhere that black folks are the only racial demo in Cali to shrink in real terms over the last 15 years; this is the real story. There is no power without a power-base and black LA's powerbase is shrinking. There is a reverse migration back to the south happening, and traditionally black neighborhoods are becoming brown. Back east, gentrification means white hipsters move into black neighborhoods and the black folks move out, but there is a missing step in Cali that involves the black and brown.

This past election shows just how racist the Black community is. From Oprah to just about every commentary I have heard, the talk is of electing a Black man to the presidency. I for one elected a Democrat to the highest office of our land. He is first and foremost a Democrat. Barack Obama is the most intelligent and compassionate individual who ran for office and  hopefully he and his entourage will get our country on track.