Jessica Porter

Jessica PorterJessica Porter is a second year graduate student majoring in Broadcast Journalism. She has a special interest reporting on politics and social issues. This past summer Jessica interned at Rainbow Circle Films in South Africa. While there she made her first documentary about a young refugee from Zimbabwe. She also received credit on the film "Forgotten Gold" for voice over writing and post-production. She is a reporter and graduate associate for Annenberg Television News. In her free time Jessica enjoys hiking, salsa dancing and traveling. She has traveled to Europe, Israel and most recently South Africa. Jessica will be working on a project with News21 reporting on the influence of money into politics.

Recent stories by Jessica Porter

More Questions Than Answers One Year After Health Reform

One of many signs held high at a rally for health care reform in Seattle in May 2009. The Affordable Care Act had not passed yet. (seiuhealthcare775nw/Flickr)Health care is one of the most important issues for seniors. After all, older people tend to have more expensive illnesses, more pre-existing conditions, and often have to pay more for insurance. So it should come as no surprise that AARP, with more than half of its members under 65 and not yet eligible for Medicare, is one of the largest supporters of health care reform.

In 2009 the organization hired more than 50 lobbyists to push for the passage of the Affordable Care Act, according to the Center for Public Integrity.

The bill passed and was signed into law in March of last year. Those in Congress opposed to what they call ObamaCare immediately vowed to repeal it, but that's no longer the main concern for AARP.

Anthem To Raise Premiums While Making Huge Profits

Graphic: Jessica PorterAnthem Blue Cross spent $2 million lobbying the California legislature and another $1.6 million on campaign contributions between 2009 and 2010. It lobbied the Department of Managed Health Care, the Department of Insurance and the Governor's office regarding health insurance regulations.

In particular, Anthem spent a significant amount of time lobbying against SB1163, a piece of legislation that gave the state the power to review premium increases.

So what, you say? Anthem is planning to raise its premiums almost 15 percent for more than 150,000 of its members.

Backgrounder: The Money Behind California's Open Primaries

How Prop 14 works. Click to enlarge. (Jessica Porter)Yesterday Republican Sharon Runner of Lancaster and Democrat Ted Lieu of Torrance became the first to win office outright under the new open primary system in California. Because both candidates won more than 50 percent of the vote, respectively, neither will have to go to a runoff.

In the past, one candidate from every political party was put on a ballot for the general election. Under the new system, which was voted into law as Proposition 14 last June, all candidates are lumped into a single primary. If no one wins a majority of the vote, the top two, regardless of political party, advance to the general election. That means two candidates from the same party could face off in a general election. And that, in theory, could lead to more moderate candidates, since a Republican voter would likely pick the more conservative of two Democrats, and vice versa. It also means that third-party candidates are likely not to be represented in the general election.

So, taking a look back for a moment, who put money on Prop 14, and who stands to benefit?