Intersections

Pioneering the Pacific Rim: Baseball, California, and the Creation of Transpacific Trade

In the years following WWII, California's athletes served as the transnational bridge between Asia and the United States.

About the Author

Ryan Reft has a PhD in urban history from the University of California San Diego. He is co-editor of the blog Tropics of Meta.
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Recent Stories
Diving into Integration: Sammy Lee, Historical Memory, and the Complexity of Housing Segregation in Cold War California

Diving into Integration: Sammy Lee, Historical Memory, and the Complexity of Housing Segregation in Cold War California

Even with the clearest of minds, personal and historical memory ebb and flow. Recollections of our own past and that of the society around us often become shaped by current circums ...
Noiring L.A.: Mildred Pierce, The Reckless Moment, and Reinforcing Postwar Suburban Gender Roles

Noiring L.A.: Mildred Pierce, The Reckless Moment, and Reinforcing Postwar Suburban Gender Roles

Handful of early film noirs placed mothers and women at their center, pushing back against noir restraints, but still reinforcing domestic, gender, and racial normatives of the day ...
Noiring L.A.: The Crimson Kimono and Asian American Sexuality in the Age of the Cold War

Noiring L.A.: The Crimson Kimono and Asian American Sexuality in the Age of the Cold War

Fuller's 1959 film took a very different approach from other film noir of the 1950s, and serves as useful text from which to consider changes to the genre and Southern California's ...
Noiring L.A.: Double Indemnity, Black Dahlia, and the Fears of Postwar America

Noiring L.A.: Double Indemnity, Black Dahlia, and the Fears of Postwar America

Noir made L.A. the city intellectuals loved to hate, yet perversely for European intellects, notably those hailing from France and Britain, this only deepened the fascination.
Not Bowling Alone: How the Holiday Bowl in Crenshaw Became an Integrated Leisure Space

Not Bowling Alone: How the Holiday Bowl in Crenshaw Became an Integrated Leisure Space

The bowling alley, which was demolished in 2003, served as an integrated leisure space where African, Mexican, and Asian Americans could interact.
The Shifting Cultures of Multiracial Boyle Heights

The Shifting Cultures of Multiracial Boyle Heights

Los Angeles of the 1920s remained a segregated landscape, many neighborhoods boasted a diverse non-white population consisting of Latino, Asian, African American faces.
Archiving Memories of El Monte in a Transnational Space

Archiving Memories of El Monte in a Transnational Space

Some of L.A.'s most important history lay in the periphery, in towns like El Monte and South El Monte. But how do we excavate and broadcast its important history?
Spitting Hot Fire: Malibu Wildfires and the Santa Anas

Spitting Hot Fire: Malibu Wildfires and the Santa Anas

Malibu is the wildfire capital of North America and, possibly, the world, but residents continue to have a love affair with the beachfront area.
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