Chapter 2 The Present

As Compton enters a new era of social stability and economical development, its city government and residents see Richland Farms' as a potential ecological, sustainable, urban agricultural model.

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Mayisha Akbar - Executive Director, Compton Jr. Posse
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Andrew Johnson - Horseshoer
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Eric J. Perrodin - Mayor Of Compton
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Pueblos Unidos Of The Family Reynaga - Jocie Reynaga
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Charro Culture - Tomas Carlos And Father
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Mildred Johnson - Raymond Park Community Garden
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Rachel Surls - County Director at UC Cooperative Extension
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Non-governmental Organizations
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Cliff Williams - Cliff Texas Style Burritos
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Compton Creek
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Yvonne Arceneaux - Councilwoman 3rd District
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The New Compton

The Present Mural

As Compton enters a new era of social stability and economical development, its city government and a handful of NGO'S - such as Heal the Bay, the Santa Monica Mountain Conservancy, the Watershed Council - and a few community residents and activists see Richland Farms' as a potential ecological, sustainable, urban agricultural model that can be replicated in other inner cities across the nation. Despite having a common goal, their efforts often collide.

A group of students from the Environmental Charter School sat down with community leader Mayisha Akbar, Compton's Major Eric J Perrodin, Councilwoman Yvonne Arceneaux and horse handler Jocie Reynaga from the ranch "Pueblos Unidos" - and other members of the community - to try to understand a common goal between these diverse parties and possibly plant the seed for discussion and engagement around the future of Richland Farms.