The Lost Bridle Paths of Beverly Hills

Bridle paths ran down the center of Sunset Boulevard and Rodeo Drive, intersecting at the Beverly Hills Hotel. Courtesy of the Beverly Hills Public Library Historical Collection.


Across the Southland in the early 1920s, horses were vanishing from public streets, their once-essential motive power made obsolete by the internal combustion engine. Buses replaced horse-drawn omnibuses. Automobile taxis replaced horse-drawn hacks. Heavy-duty trucks replaced horse-drawn wagons.

But Beverly Hills bucked the trend.

From the early 1920s through the 1960s, pathways dedicated to horse travel ran down the center of several Beverly Hills streets. One stretched from the city's eastern to western boundary, meandering through town down the center of Sunset Boulevard. Another occupied the median of Rodeo Drive, where it replaced an abandoned Pacific Electric trolley line that once connected Santa Monica Boulevard with the Beverly Hills Hotel. Two more snaked their way up Coldwater and Benedict canyons.

Laid with decomposed granite and buffered from automobile traffic by curbs and ornamental plants, these bridle paths served several purposes. They satisfied the recreational urges of the city's many equine enthusiasts. They reinforced the image of Beverly Hills as a place of wealth and privilege. They preserved the rustic feel of a city that was fervently carving itself out of the open countryside of Rancho Rodeo de las Aguas. And lastly, though saddle horses were never as common on city streets as draft horses, they nostalgically recalled that dying breed -- the urban horse.

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For a time, Beverly Hills' bridle paths teemed with horseback riders and the occasional tally-ho. A grand pageant marked the completion of the city's bridle path network on January 10, 1925. The Bridle Path Association placed signs at the paths' entrances proclaiming that they led from "Beverly Hills to the Sea and the Mountains" -- a reference to the organization's ambitious plans to lace the Santa Monica Mountains with equestrian trails.

"It is now generally recognized that the horse deserves a large place in our affections -- not alone as an instrument of healthful recreation but also because of the very great value in our economic life," wrote the Bridle Path Association's president, banker Irving Hellman, in 1924, "and in so admitting it seems but natural that we should want to make ample provision for the enjoyment of its usefulness."

The city's enthusiasm for horses soon waned, however, and eventually its bridle paths fell into disuse. Another recreational craze briefly gave the paths new life in 1938, when, in the midst of a nationwide bicycle fever, the city opened them up to bicycles -- transforming the old bridle paths into some of the region's finest cycling infrastructure. But after World War II brought an abrupt end to the nation's obsession with biking, the city slowly dismantled the aging paths. By 1965, grassy medians occupied the space where horses once trod.

Special thanks to Gail Stein of the Beverly Hills Public Library, who provided invaluable research assistance and contributed several of the images featured here.

Courtesy of the Security Pacific National Bank Collection - Los Angeles Public Library.

Courtesy of the Beverly Hills Public Library Historical Collection.

Courtesy of the Beverly Hills Public Library Historical Collection.

A sign over the entrances to the bridle paths proclaimed, perhaps somewhat misleadingly, that they led 'to the mountains and the sea.' Courtesy of the Security Pacific National Bank Collection - Los Angeles Public Library.

Aerial view of Beverly Hills in 1921, showing Rodeo Drive and its bridle path on the far left. Courtesy of the Security Pacific National Bank Collection - Los Angeles Public Library.

Circa 1924 aerial view of the Beverly Hills Hotel, showing Sunset Boulevard and its bridle path on the bottom-right. Courtesy of the Security Pacific National Bank Collection - Los Angeles Public Library.

In 1938, the city of Beverly Hills opened its underused bridle paths to bicycles. Courtesy of the Automobile Club of Southern California Archives.

L.A. as Subject is an association of more than 230 libraries, museums, official archives, cultural institutions, and private collectors. Hosted by the USC Libraries, L.A. as Subject is dedicated to preserving and telling the sometimes-hidden stories and histories of the Los Angeles region..

About the Author

A writer specializing in Los Angeles history, Nathan Masters serves as manager of academic events and programming communications for the USC Libraries, the host institution for L.A. as Subject.
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