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    The actor uncovers the gossip, intrigue and scandal lurking behind the closed doors of some of the world's most famous rooms and suites. He visits the Chateau Marmont on Hollywood's Sunset Boulevard, where Howard Hughes famously holed up in the penthouse, Jean Harlow and Clark Gable carried out a torrid affair and Lindsay Lohan was recently temporarily banned for not paying a bill. In New York, he talks to former mobster Louis Ferrante about a robbery at the Pierre Hotel in 1972 in which cash and jewellery worth $10million was stolen.
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    The actor learns what it means to be treated like a VIP in some of the world's finest hotels. He heads to the Harlequin Suite at London's Dorchester, where Elizabeth Taylor had a pink marbled bathroom installed. He also visits Paris's Le Meurice, the place Salvador Dali returned to every year for 30 years. He meets the surrealist artist's muse Amanda Lear, who talks about his antics, as well as how his legacy celebrated in the hotel today. In America, Richard gets a true taste of the lifestyle of the megarich when he orders the $5,000 fleurburger at the Mandalay Bay Hotel in Las Vegas.
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    Four D-Day veterans share their experiences at the Museum of World War II in Natick, Massachusetts.
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    The Withnail & I actor presents the travel show highlighting some of the world's most luxurious hotels, and exploring the many varied aspects of the hospitality industry. He begins by examining the roles power and money play in the business, checking into Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, California's Barkley Pet Hotel and the $44,000-a-night Ty Warner Penthouse at the Four Seasons in New York.
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    The actor tours the rooms, restaurants and bars where the rich and famous have lived, died and fallen in love, checking in to Bastille's L'Hotel in Paris where Oscar Wilde spent his last days. He travels to New York's Chelsea Hotel, where long-term residents included Mark Twain, Stanley Kubrick, Edith Piaf, Sid Vicious and Robert Mapplethorpe. Richard also heads to the Dorchester in London's Mayfair, where Britt Ekland shares her memories of meeting and falling for Peter Sellers there in 1964.
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    The world is getting very fat, very fast. The obesity epidemic has spread to the Third World and it is likely 1 billion people will be obese by 2030. So how did it explode in places that, not so long ago, counted malnutrition and even famine as major concerns? Well it's mostly about the aggressive marketing and low prices of Western fast food. As globalisation and a little more money open up Third World markets, the first to step in are the likes of McDonalds and Coke. In this global production, we travel to China where the consumption of sugar and oil has sent the national scales spinning; to Brazil where global food companies have fundamentally altered traditional diets; to India where it's predicted 100 million people will soon be suffering diabetes and on to Mexico, where the weight problem is so pressing, stomach reduction surgery is offered for free. The diagnosis is stark: "No country has managed the transition to get rid of hunger without it shifting to obesity" says anti-obesity crusader Barry Popkin
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    "Question One" is a probing and insightful look at one of the most bitterly divisive and issues facing our nation today - same sex marriage. Award winning journalists, Joe Fox and James Nubile got unprecedented access to cover both sides of Maine's historic 2009 marriage referendum election. The result is a searing documentary that brings us up close and personal to one election, that tore a state apart and was instrumental in shaping the national landscape of this fast evolving civil rights issue. In war room style fashion, "Question One" has done what no other film has; chronicles the behind-the scenes workings of the pro and anti same-sex marriage campaigns as they fought for the hearts, minds and votes of the people of Maine. For three months, the filmmakers imbedded themselves in war rooms and strategy sessions as they captured the private thoughts, fears and conflicts expressed by key leaders as well as followed the foot soldiers and volunteers as they knocked on countless doors and made endless phone c
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    Veterans set out to ensure the Navy's role in the Allied invasion of Europe in 1944 is remembered.
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    Posted Test
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    "Last Samurai" is still living in Japan. Risuke Ohtake, 88 years old, takes more than 900 deciples and half of them are not Japanese.
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    Mt. Fuji was registered aspart of the world's cultural heritage in 2013. At Ultra-Trail Mt. Fuji, participants have to run more than 160 kilometers (100 miles) of wild mountain pass in 48 hours. Utilizing many cameras attached to runners as well as cameras attached to radio control helicopters, this program gives a glimpse at the conditioning and performance of runners at this high altitude.
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    Chef Tatsuo Saito attends the Sakura Matsuri Japanese Street Festival 2014 in Washington DC to showcase the characteristics of Japanese cuisine.
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    A young wrestler from Egypt has taken the world of sumo by storm under the name of Osunaarashi – or “Great Sandstorm” in Japanese. It took him only 18 months to reach the top makunouchi division, where only 42 of all 600 wrestlers are admitted. That’s the fastest rise ever among foreign-born wrestlers. But, fighting his way up through the ranks was no easy task. As a Muslim and the first professional wrestler from Africa, Osunaarashi was forced to overcome countless cultural differences. And, he had to adapt to the spartan lifestyle of sumo wrestling under the stern but benevolent gaze of his stable master. Tune in to discover how Osunaarashi’s passion and perseverance are driving his dream of reaching the highest rank of yokozuna.
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    Meet the aid workers who keep the peace between the camps and the surrounding hostile villagers.
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    The Sudanese refugee camp's medieval medical practices, from bleeding to burning, are revealed.
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    San Francisco's Piedmont East Bay Children's Choir attend Laulupidu, the National Song Festival.
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    Bogota's mass transit system and the history of the world's most popular beverage are explored.
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    The origins of the Sierra Nevada mountain range and its influence on California are explored.
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    The distinct culture and heritage of Reconcavo and the Atlantic Forest of Brazil are highlighted.
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    The colonial buildings of Curacao and the incomparable marine life Bonaire are showcased.
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    A Japanese jazz giant, a hip-hop freestyler and more colorful characters of Tokyo are visited.
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