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D. J. Waldie
About Me:
D. J. Waldie is the author of "Holy Land: A Suburban Memoir" and "Where We Are Now: Notes from Los Angeles." He is a contributing editor for the Los Angeles Times.
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  • Entry
    It wasn't easy to bring together a diverse community of working-class people in the early 1950s. Their cultural differences were real, but their aspirations were shared.
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    Susan Straight lives a few blocks from where she was born in Riverside. She's a part of that place and its stories. Because she is, Straight says there are two kinds of people: those who stay and those who leave.
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    I went to Chicago the other day. It had been a hard winter on the western shore of Lake Michigan, my hosts told me.
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    Every map is a fiction, but some maps are more fictional than others.
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    Spring is a season for endings and beginnings. Back in 2010, I wrote about the palms in front of a building down the block that have renewed themselves year after year. Their persistence continues.
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    Metro bought the station in 2011 from Catellus Development (a descendant of the Santa Fe and Southern Pacific railroads) for $75 million. The station is beginning a multi-year program of expansion, renovation, and conservation. I can only hope that the project will retain Union Station's capacity for daydreaming.
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    Among those honored last week by the city of Lakewood is a man you probably haven't heard of, but he affected the lives of millions of Los Angeles County residents. His name is Joe Gonsalves.
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    Workers demolishing an old citrus packinghouse in Upland recently uncovered a sign hidden by a long-ago addition to the building. And that got me to thinking about American language in the landscape, where it goes, and what nearly unreadable signs mean.
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    When Lakewood residents voted for incorporation in 1954, they determined the kind of city they wanted Lakewood to become.
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    California's little governments operate under the shield of the legislation that created them. And when long-ago governors signed enabling bills that created the little governments, the governors promptly forgot about them. The Central Basin Municipal Water District shows why that's a problem.