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Maria Zizka
About Me:
Maria Zizka is a Berkeley-born food writer and cook. She writes recipes and stories from a little cottage near Santa Monica Beach.
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  • Entry
    Icebox cake is so named because it relies not on an oven, as most cakes do, but rather on an icebox. In other words, it is a terrific cake to make in the summertime.
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    Gazpacho usually comes in one of two colors: red or green. But there's no reason why you shouldn't give yellow gazpacho a try.
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    Whether you're a notable sixty-nine-year-old violinist or a grandchild who loves to play with dough, these crunchy cookies are sure to lift your mood.
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    These days, Natalie is the one making imam bayildi for her grandchildren. She has re-created the recipe to the best of her memory, with a few tweaks.
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    Shishitos are my favorite part of going out for tempura. Often I wish I had a plate of only fried shishitos. Luckily, making them at home is a whole lot easier than it sounds.
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    Eton mess is a classic British dessert, traditionally made with strawberries rather than peaches. The idea here is to use any ripe, flavorful fruit and let its juices drip down through the layers of whipped cream and crumbled pavlova.
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    For the time being, Grand Central Market is having a magical moment in which both greasy chow mein and boutique kombucha are co-existing under one roof.
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    Here is my go-to popcorn recipe. It is followed by a few variations, each named for a different world city. How would the popcorn from your city be seasoned?
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    This apricot tart is simple, gorgeous, and just as delicious for dessert as it is for breakfast. Serve it in the evening with sweetened whipped cream that has a dash of rum stirred into it, or serve it in the morning with a spoonful of yogurt.
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    When Gerald Frazee worked as a butcher in Reedley, California during the 1950s, he had to throw away the less popular cuts of meat. His customers would almost never go for brain, heart, or tongue when there were pork chops to be had.