6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
Earth Focus

Earth Focus

Start watching
5LQmQJY-show-poster2x3-MRWBpAK.jpg

Reporter Roundup

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

Metro to Test Locking Turnstiles at Rail Stations

Support Provided By
Turnstiles at the Metro Gold Line Soto Station
Turnstiles at the Metro Gold Line Soto Station

Question. How do you spot someone who has never used the subway in Los Angeles? Answer. They're standing at an unlocked turnstyle trying to swipe a paper ticket to let them through.

As a daily subway rider, this is a scene I witness every so often, and it's no fault to the new patron. Metro is currently amid a very long (and quite controversial) transition of changing how fares work. The system overhaul will eventually mirror other big cities where you buy a ticket at a machine that spits out a card that can be read by a card reader at a gate or turnstile (and also refilled and used over and over again). Until recently, that wasn't an option, and the rail lines were (and still are) on the honor system.

Things are slowly catching up and this week Metro officials will lock turnstiles for the first time in a demonstration project at the Purple Line's Wilshire and Normandie Station in Koreatown.

The exercise from 1 to 4 p.m. will be part of a data gathering process to determine the usage of Metro's Transit Access Pass (TAP) smart cards. Officials want to determine what types of paper tickets and passes are still being used by riders. Those using those older fare media will be "tapped" in by staff and L.A. County Sheriff's Department personnel.

At this point there is no date for locking turnstiles throughout the system, said Kim Upton, a Metro spokesperson. She explained that the agency hopes to identify a goal date based upon results from the test.

The tests will continue each Wednesday for a month from 1 to 4 p.m., each time expanding by one station:

  • October 5th: Wilshire/Normandie plus Vermont/Beverly
  • October 12th: Wilshire/Normandie and Vermont/Beverly plus Hollywood/Western
  • October 19th: Wilshire/Normandie,  Vermont/Beverly and Hollywood/Western plus Wilshire/Western

Want more news? Like and follow KCET News on Facebook and Twitter.

The photo used on this post is by Flickr user paulkimo90. It was used under a Creative Commons License.

Support Provided By
Read More
An education worker receives a vaccination at a mass vaccination site in a parking lot at Hollywood Park adjacent to SoFi stadium during the Covid-19 pandemic on March 1, 2021 in Inglewood, California.

COVID-19 Vaccine Effort Expands to Teachers, Other Workers

The pool of residents eligible for COVID-19 vaccinations vastly expanded in Los Angeles County today, with teachers and other essential workers added to the list of those who qualify for vaccines.
Students at Manchester Ave. Elementary School have virtual meet and greet with teacher

State Deal Encourages School Reopening by April; but Local Resistance Looms

Gov. Gavin Newsom and legislative leaders announced a multibillion-dollar deal today aimed at enticing schools to resume in-person instruction for young students by April 1, but it's unlikely L.A. Unified will meet that date.
(LEFT) ER nurse Adwoa Blankson-Wood pictured near the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, wearing scrubs and a surgical mask; By October, Blankson-Wood was required to don an N-95 mask, protective goggles, a head covering and full PPE to interact with patients.

As A Black Nurse at The Pandemic's Frontlines, I've Had A Close Look at America's Racial Divisions

Most of the time, I was able to frame conversations within the context of the virus and not race, telling patients that we were doing our best, trying to be the heroes they kept calling us. But I was dying inside .... It was easier to find solace in my job, easier to be just a nurse, than to be a Black nurse.