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Tip: Parking Enforcement Relaxed on Thanksgiving in L.A.

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Going to a Thanksgiving dinner at a house on a street that requires a permit? Will you be parking at a meter in front of a store for some last-minute ingredients? Is your car going to be parked where street cleaning is scheduled next Thursday morning? You might not have to worry. Los Angeles parking enforcement officers take days off, too. Well, some of them, at least.

You can park here without a permit on Thanksgiving | Photo by Zach Behrens/KCET
You can park here without a permit on Thanksgiving | Photo by Zach Behrens/KCET

As tradition, the City of Angels relaxes many parking laws on several holidays throughout the year and that includes Thanksgiving. But be warned, some rules will still apply (watch for signs that say "Including Holidays"), and when swarms of shoppers hit the stores for "Black Friday" the next day, those parking laws will be back in action.

Here are the parking regulations and signs that will not be enforced, according to a city memo:

1. Time limited parking (i.e. one hour, two hour, four hours, etc.)
2. Parking meters (unless posted to include holidays). Exceptions include, but are not limited to, areas around Venice Beach and in West Los Angeles. In these areas, the signs reflect "Including Holidays."
3. No Parking signs with specified days/time limits, (i.e. 7:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m., 8:00 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.). This includes "Street Cleaning" signs.
4. No Stopping signs with specified time limits (i.e. 7:00 a.m. to 9:00 a.m., 4:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.). This includes Peak Hour parking restrictions.
5. Preferential Parking (unless posted to include holidays).

The following safety violations will still be enforced:

1. Red zones, including bus zones.
2. Yellow/White zones
3. Alleys
4. Sidewalks
5. Handicapped Zones (also known as Blue zones)
6. "No Parking Anytime" zones (including "Tow Away" restrictions)
7. "No Stopping Anytime" zones.
8. All temporary "No Stopping" or "No Parking" zones.
9. Requests for service from residents, such as when a car is blocking a driveway.

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