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Statement on Federal Funding | KCET

Title

Statement on Federal Funding

An Important Message from KCET

The Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), the government agency that allocates money* to public broadcasting, is at risk of being defunded by the current administration, along with the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities. Federal support is a critical source of funding that allows public media, like KCET to meet the educational and informational needs of diverse and underserved communities.  

Logos: PMPM, CPB, NEH, NEA

KCET, Southern California’s leading independent public media organization, is a recipient of federal money through CPB and the NEA, and we stand shoulder-to-shoulder with PBS and NPR as a unified voice for federal support for public media. We also champion the federal support for national foundations, such as the NEA and the NEH that fund the arts and humanities.

Without that support, we would not be able to produce original educational content that brings commercial-free vibrant storytelling to our region, including such important programs as Artbound, exploring the arts & culture landscape in Southern California; Tending the Wild, looking at the traditional customs and practices of native Californians and how they can address present day environmental challenges; and SoCal Connected, bringing to light important local news and information impacting our community, such as the special broadcast on finding solutions for homelessness in Los Angeles.

Please visit Protect My Public Media to sign a petition so we can continue to carry out our collective mission around education and community service, and amplify critical issues affecting our community that would otherwise remain unheard.

Alternatively, you can call your representative in Congress and let them know why these are important to you and your community.

Help us ensure that one of America’s most trusted institutions, and the funding that supports them, continue to help inspire millions of people like you.

*In 2016:

-The CPB got .01% of total federal spending – that amounts to $1.35 per year/per taxpayer

-The NEA and the NEH each got .003% amounting to .46 cents per year/per taxpayer

Val Zavala explains CPB and other funding sources

FAQ

Is KCET affected by federal budget cuts?

KCET, Southern California’s leading independent public media organization, is a recipient of federal money through CPB and the NEA. KCET stands shoulder-to-shoulder with PBS and NPR as a unified voice for federal support for public media. We also champion the federal support for national foundations, such as the NEA and the NEH that fund the arts and humanities.

Without that support, we would not be able to produce original educational content that brings commercial-free vibrant storytelling to our region, including such important programs as Artbound, exploring the arts & culture landscape in Southern California; Tending the Wild, looking at the traditional customs and practices of native Californians and how they can address present day environmental challenges; and SoCal Connected, bringing to light important local news and information impacting our community.

How much CPB money do you receive?

It varies slightly each year based on revenue we receive from non-federal financial sources. On average CPB funding represents 5-10% of our total operating budget.

How important is CPB money to the financial stability of the public media system?

Federal support is critical to keeping the public media mission alive, particularly with a broad downward trend from individual donations.

America can’t afford NOT to have public media in their lives. Public media provides a tremendous value to communities it serves, including enriching populations in diverse and underserved communities with non-commercial educational and cultural programs.

KCETLink

KCETLINK MEDIA GROUP is the national independent public media organization formed by the merger between KCET and Link Media. A viewer-supported 501c(3) organization, its content is distributed nationally via satellite on DIRECTV (ch. 375) and DISH Network (ch. 9410), in Southern and Central California via broadcast and cable, as well as through various digital delivery systems.