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Black Arts Matter

Black arts bear witness to centuries of fight not flight. See how their rich legacies continue to rally this nation’s spirit in pursuit of justice and joy.
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A man holding a large video camera.
Article
Artbound

In Every Era, Black Filmmakers of L.A. Struggle to Tell Their Stories

Filmmaking is not only a way to tell a story, but to preserve memory. In every era, Black filmmakers like Gregory Everett, Zeinabu irene Davis, Ava Duvernay and Issa Rae continue to use film as a medium to keep their stories alive.
A collage image of the same African American man in different stages of his life.
Article
Artbound

No Longer Overlooked: Gregory Everett's Impact on Black Los Angeles

From his west side part series to his community work in the Crenshaw District, Gregory Everett has always been motivated by the larger perspective, but his impact stayed relatively underground. Learn more about this pivotal person in the Black L.A. community.
A woman breathes out as white doves fly in the mural "Our Mighty Contribution"
Article
Artbound

The Great Wall of Crenshaw and the Ongoing Story of Black Los Angeles

Since the 1990s, Los Angeles has become less African American, as a way to hold onto their cultural integrity, Black Angelenos have turned to public art to help tell their ongoing story.
A collage of 1980s and '90s photos with flyers in the background.
Article
Artbound

The Westside Dance Movement That Laid the Foundation for West Coast Hip-Hop

During the early 1980s, throwing parties was one of the most lucrative ways for people in the 'hood to make money. Learn more about Ultra Wave, a popular crew that animated the Westside of Los Angeles.
A wooden shadowbox diorama with four miniature Black men on horseback. They're all wearing cowboy hats and cowboy attire. Behind them is a miniature white fence with various skin-toned dots painted onto the back of the shadowbox, implying a crowd of people beyond. Gold, sparkly block letters read, "Compton Cowboys."
Article
Artbound

How One Woman’s Miniatures Are Helping Tell Powerful Black Stories

A self-taught folk artist, Karen Collins and her collection of miniatures tell important stories about the struggles and triumphs of the Black community.
A still from the short animated film "Wolf and Cub" depicts a Black father and son standing at the edge of a cliff, looking off to a vast desert landscape. In the middle of the desert landscape is a building. The son is piggy-backed on the father's shoulders and the father is holding some sort of staff.
Article
Fine Cut

An Animator’s Sudden Death Derailed His Film, So His Friends Finished It for Him

The short animated film was the last script written by CalArts animator and writer Marvin Scott Bynoe before his sudden death March 2020. Over a year later, the unfinished project was completed by over 80 CalArts students and professors as a labor of love.
A Black man is hugged by other children in a schoolroom space.
Article
Muhammad Ali

7 Artists Take On Muhammad Ali's Legacy Outside the Ring

As Parkinson's disease began to attack boxing great Muhammad Ali, he took the fight outside the ring, giving voice to the voiceless, particularly communities of color at home and abroad. Inspired by his work, eight artists create a more complex portrait of the icon.
A young woman smiles at the camera with roller skates on.
Article
Artbound

Black Angelenos Reclaim L.A.’s Roller Skate Culture on the Rinks and in the Streets

Today's jam skaters draw from a community built over generations at Venice Beach and rinks across the city.
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