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Community Arts

Art doesn't exist in a vacuum. Often it is an expression of a community's desires and struggles. Explore how communities inform and enrich civic life, arts and culture.
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A mural is painted on a white wall. The mural depicts an antelope with pink Converse sneakers hanging off its antler. Behind the antelope, a pink, cloudy smoke billows. At the bottom right corner of the wall has a pink circle with the words, "NUR!" in white painted over.
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Artbound

Artist's Murals Depict Life that Persists in the High Desert

Lancaster-based muralist Nuri Amanatullah's murals illustrate the vibrancy and beauty of the desert wildlife while also serving as centerpieces for the people of Antelope Valley.
A man holding a large video camera.
Article
Artbound

In Every Era, Black Filmmakers of L.A. Struggle to Tell Their Stories

Filmmaking is not only a way to tell a story, but to preserve memory. In every era, Black filmmakers like Gregory Everett, Zeinabu irene Davis, Ava Duvernay and Issa Rae continue to use film as a medium to keep their stories alive.
A collage image of the same African American man in different stages of his life.
Article
Artbound

No Longer Overlooked: Gregory Everett's Impact on Black Los Angeles

From his west side party series to his community work in the Crenshaw District, Gregory Everett has always been motivated by the larger perspective, but his impact stayed relatively underground. Learn more about this pivotal person in the Black L.A. community.
A woman breathes out as white doves fly in the mural "Our Mighty Contribution"
Article
Artbound

The Great Wall of Crenshaw and the Ongoing Story of Black Los Angeles

Since the 1990s, Los Angeles has become less African American, as a way to hold onto their cultural integrity, Black Angelenos have turned to public art to help tell their ongoing story.
A collage of 1980s and '90s photos with flyers in the background.
Article
Artbound

The Westside Dance Movement That Laid the Foundation for West Coast Hip-Hop

During the early 1980s, throwing parties was one of the most lucrative ways for people in the 'hood to make money. Learn more about Ultra Wave, a popular crew that animated the Westside of Los Angeles.
J. Sergio O'Cadiz Moctezuma wearing a black suit and tie, sitting on a fireplace mantle. His leg is crossed over the other and a writing surface is resting on his knee. He's looking down and appears to be writing something down. He's smiling.
Article
Artbound

Sergio O'Cadiz and the Forgotten Artists of Color in Orange County

The arc of arts leader Sergio O’Cadiz Moctezuma is a lesson on the dynamics of artists of color in the Orange County. Just like there’s a link between U.S. history and ethnic cleansing in history books, there exists a similar link between the acknowledgement of a culture’s experienced reality and its representation in the Orange County art scene.
Grown men in wide-brimmed hats watch the goings-on at the Pico Rivera Sports Arena, a 6,000-seat facility designed expressly for charreadas.
Article
Artbound

How Pico Rivera Became the Epicenter of Charrería and Mexican Ranch Life in L.A.

For decades, the Pico Rivera Sports Arena has remained a cultural institution and cornerstone for generations of Mexican American families and the Latino community at large. As it flourished, so did charrería, Mexican rodeo.
A vibrant mural painted on the side of a public restroom structure depicts three farm workers bent over rows of corn. Behind the silhouetted farmworkers is a bright yellow sun with red-orange rays emanating from the center. Behind the sun is an Aztec eagle with its arms outstretched to the sides, the official symbol of the United Farmworkers Union.
Article
Artbound

Santa Barbara Left Beloved Murals Out of a Park Plan. Neighbors Are Fighting to Keep Them Around.

The first draft of the City of Santa Barbara's Ortega Park Master Plan called for the removal of the park's 15 cultural murals. Neighbors, activists and mural artists pushed for the preservation of the pieces, murals that displayed Chicano history, mythology and artwork for the community.
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