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El Movimiento

In the 1960s, the Chicano Movement, also known as El Movimiento, advocated for Mexican American empowerment across a broad spectrum of issues — from land reclamation and labor rights, to education reform and cultural identity. Learn about the Chicanos who shaped the movement, their acts of resistance and the lasting legacies they leave behind.
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Cheech Marlin smiles during an interview.
Show

The Cheech

Explore Cheech Marin's lifelong advocacy of the Chicano Art Movement and his journey to develop the Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art, Culture and Industry.
Oscar Zeta Acosta smiles during a march with others joined behind him.
Preview
0:30
Voces

Trailer | The Rise and Fall of the Brown Buffalo

Discover the life of radical Chicano lawyer Oscar Zeta Acosta
The Chicano Rights Movement
Clip
2:32
Voces

The Chicano Rights Movement

Explore the historic 1968 “Walkouts."
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Clip
1:26
Latino Americans

Dolores Huerta

Dolores Huerta, along with Cesar Chavez co-founded the United Farm Workers
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Clip
16:20
Latino Americans

Farmworkers Strike

Caesar Chavez and Dolores Huerta lead the farmworkers strike in California
Rubén Salazar with former President Eisenhower, San Bernardino, CA, 1961| Rubén Salazar (1928-1970) Papers, USC Libraries Special Collections
Article
Lost LA

Truths Unsilenced: The Life, Death and Legacy of Rubén Salazar

The Chicano Moratorium and the death of Rubén Salazar continue to reverberate today as communities of color speak out against police brutality and discrimination, and as journalists are once again targeted, attacked and undermined by government officials.
latino americans
Episode
55:16
Latino Americans

Latino Americans | Pride and Prejudice

Witness the creation of the proud "Chicano" identity as labor leaders organize farm workers in California, and as activists push for better education opportunities for Latinos, the inclusion of Latino studies and empowerment in the political process.
Season 1 Episode 105
CSRC_LaRaza_B12F26S3_N010 Raul Ruiz speaks at a La Raza Unida meeting | La Raza photograph collection. Courtesy of UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
Article
Artbound

I am a Mexicano: The Legacy of Chicano Journalist and Activist Raul Ruiz

Photographer, journalist, activist, as well as a Harvard educated scholar and CSU Northridge professor, Raul Ruiz showed Chicanos what to aspire to. He passed away June 13 at the age of 78.
La Raza first edition Volume 1, No. 0, September 4, 1967 | Courtesy of UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center
Article
Artbound

La Raza: The Power of the Paper Unfolds in the Chicano Movement

The origins of La Raza magazine sound like the beginning of a joke or a story that could go in any direction. However, it’s the beginning of the story of the life of one of the Chicano movement’s most important news publications.
Father Luce gives mass | Courtesy of the Church of the Epiphany
Article
Artbound

How a Small Lincoln Heights Church Energized the Chicano Movement

Nothing signals “Revolution HQ” about the Church of the Epiphany in Lincoln Heights, but if its walls could speak, perhaps they would rally and roar because this place of worship was also a place of resistance in the 1960s and 70s.
Boy on a bicycle | Debra Weber, Courtesy of UCLA Chicano Studies Research Center La Raza AB s9
Episode
57:10
Artbound

Artbound | La Raza

In East L.A. during the 1960s and 1970s, a group of young activists used creative tools like writing and photography as a means for community organizing, providing a platform for the Chicano Movement.
Season 9 Episode 5
[Left] "Santa Barbara Brown Berets aka Moratorium in Maravilla" 1970. | Photo: Oscar Castillo || [Right] "Not One More (Girl with Beret)" 2016. | Photo: Rafael Cardenas
Article
Artbound

Photos of Latino Youth Resistance, From the 1960s to Today

Protest photographs bridge Latino youth cultures across space and time. They remind us that Chicano youth continue to not only speak out about injustice but thrive despite it.
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