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Video: The Non-Traffic of the 1984 Olympics

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carmageddon-1984-olympics

Will the so-called "carmageddon" really be that bad? If officials took the lessons from the 1984 traffic plan, then things might just be fine. That's because, as two of our commentators have already pointed out, that when the 1984 Olympics occurred here in Los Angeles the "Black Friday" of traffic never surfaced on the streets.

"We were made afraid that the entire freeway system would fail. It didn't," said D.J. Waldie.

"1984 was the year of catastrophic traffic that never was," added Erin Aubry Kaplan.

For some visual proof, this SoCal Rewind feature from SoCal Connected will show you how it worked.

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Domingo Comin, an employee at Carefield Assisted Living in Castro Valley, holds his vaccination card.

Vaccine Passports in California? Answers to Your Questions

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