The Latino Experience

The Latino Experience

Start watching
Professor T

Professor T (UK)

Start watching
SoCal Update

SoCal Update

Start watching
Us

Us

Start watching
Key Art of "Summer of Rockets" featuring Keeley Hawes and Toby Stephens.

Summer of Rockets

Start watching
Line of Separation Key Art.

Line of Separation

Start watching
Artbound

Artbound

Start watching
Death in Paradise Series 10

Death in Paradise

Start watching
millionaire still

KCET Must See Movies

Start watching
Independent Lens

Independent Lens

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
Earth Focus

Earth Focus

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

5 Better Places for a Protest

Support Provided By

The New America Foundation has a California outpost. Ex-Los Angeles Times staffer Joe Mathews is among the think tank's in-state fellows.

In an early March blog post, Mathews uses the occasion of college students protesting higher school costs to point out the relative futility of holding these rallies on campuses (where they are preaching to the choir) and outside the State Capitol building ("a waste of time," Mathews says).

Instead, Mathews offers up "5 Better Places to Protest Than a College Campus." They include: gas stations, freeways, and retirement communities.

[Read the full post -- the above will make sense.]

Mathews' leading recommendation, of his five, is unsold homes. He writes:

"This would be my preference if I were a student-massive student protests outside homes that have been empty and on the market for months. "Why? Because -- as USC demographer Dowell Myers and other researchers have pointed out -- if California doesn't produce many more college graduates and high-skilled workers than it currently does, the unsold home will be the future of the state. The state needs a new generation of upwardly mobile people who can buy the houses of boomers who are just starting to retire. "This would be a memorable sort of protest. It would bring home "? literally "? the point that higher education matters in a very street-level way. And it would remind California's older votes that they have a personal stake in the future of today's students, and of the success of higher education. To seniors who say California can simply cut its way to the future, the question is: who is going to buy your house? "The symbolism of such a protest would be powerful. The dream of your own home is essential to the American dream, and the California story. And the protests would provide a new twist on the Prop 13 revolt. So scan the real estate listings, kids, and get to work."

Photo Credit: The image, from a San Francisco protest, accompanying this post was taken by Flickr user spotreporting. It was used under Creative Commons license.

Support Provided By
Read More
A light structure similar to scaffolds were used in the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics.

How the Gleeful Aesthetic of L.A.’s 1984 Olympics Unified a Sprawling City

In 1984, Los Angeles exuded Olympic psychedelia, a gleeful '80s aesthetic which underlined the complementary power of sport, culture and art. It would also revitalize a bedraggled Olympic movement.
The City of Huntington Park sign in front of City Hall hosts a welcome message for residents passing by.

Hefty Contracts for Campaign Contributors in Huntington Park

An examination of public records from 2018 and 2020 confirmed that several companies contracted by the city of Huntington Park donated gifts and campaign contributions to council members during that time. The investigation raises questions about whether council members are truly looking out for the best interests of the public when creating policies and making decisions.
0722021_Lancaster_PU_Sized_10.jpg

Thieves Are Stealing California’s Scarce Water. Where’s It Going? Illegal Marijuana Farms

As drought grips most of California, water thefts have increased to record levels. Thieves tap into hydrants, pump water from rivers and break into remote water stations and tanks.