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Filipino Eats

Celebrate the history and legacy of millions of Filipino Americans through their cuisine and discover a new generation of young and talented chefs who are telling unique stories of their heritage and history with food. Kain na! (Let’s eat!)
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A young Filipina American eats outside with a small bowl of ube upside down cake.
Episode
7:47
SoCal Wanderer

Crème Caramel LA, One of the Best Filipino Bakeries in Town

Rosey finds some of the best Filipino-baked goods in town at Crème Caramel LA.
Season 2 Episode 1
Oysters on the grill at the Manila District in downtown Los Angeles.
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

Filipino-Led Micro-Businesses Blossom in the Pandemic at L.A.'s Manila District

With the coronavirus lockdown. the momentum of the Filipino food movement came to a screeching halt. Lauren Delgado and Rayson Esquejo felt they needed to do something. But they weren't sure how, at first.
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Episode
14:40
The Migrant Kitchen

Barkada

These immigrants have one foot in their Filipino culture and the other on American soil.
Season 1 Episode 2
Arko Foods Market's workers serving customers in the turo-turo section. | Jacqueline Lee
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

Glendale's One-Stop Shop for Filipino Goods and Services

Since its opening in 1980, Arko Foods Market has run a turo-turo, a Filipino-run mom and pop fast food joint, committed to serving home-cooked Filipino meals to the Filipino community.
The original ube donut and other flavors | Courtesy of DK's Donuts
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

The Purple Yam That's Taking Over Your Dessert Table

Ube, or Filipino yam, is popping up all over the internet and on restaurant menus throughout the United States. Filipino chefs and bakers, who have been using the flavor in cooking, say it’s a sign that Filipino cuisine is here to stay.
7 Mile House circa June 1904. Original owner, Egidio Micheli, center with apron, with partner, Palmiro Testa (right). Lady on the far right back holding baby Ecle is Niccola Testa. Little girl on far right is Eva Testa | Courtesy of 7 Mile House
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

The Last Mile House Standing — 7 Mile House's More Than 160 Years of Service

Mile houses were stagecoach stops that began in the Gold Rush era. Today, the only the 7 Mile House remains in its original location. To survive, the historic location has changed with the times, evolving its menu to suit its diverse customers.
Kamayan dining with grilled fish, fried shrimp, eggplant, grilled squid and rice | Pampanguena Cuisine
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

Eat with Your Hands: Filipino Kamayan Dining from the San Fernando Valley to the Mission

Kamayan, or eating with your hands, is one thing that is truly Filipino. In the U.S., the trend of diners seeking unique experiences has seen kamayan dining enjoy a surge in popularity in recent years.
Sweet treats at FrankieLucy | Danny Jensen
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

Find Filipino Sweets with an American-European Twist In Silver Lake

FrankieLucy's desserts incorporate traditional Filipino ingredients, including ube and pandan to create inventive spins on classic American, European and Filipino desserts.
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