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California Governor Passes Homemade Food Bill

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Good news for Los Angeles food makers and eaters: Governor Jerry Brown signed AB 1616, the California Homemade Food Act, into law. The bill, orchestrated by Silver Lake Assemblyman Mike Gatto, allows for the sale of certain homemade food products, specifically those deemed "non-hazardous." Sadly, 2am Danger Dogs aren't covered, but local makers of jams, breads, and other "safe" (no cream or custard, no meat) food products are free to sell them in restaurants, grocery stores, and directly to customers.

Since the measure strikes down previous mandates requiring the lease of certified kitchens, the cost and complication of homemade goods will significantly decrease, allowing home foodmakers to more directly cash in on their goods. In a statement from the governor's office, Brown noted that, "it's important that state government bolsters local job growth. Simply put, these bills make it easier for people to do business in California."

Producers of homemade goods won't be making and selling food with no guidelines whatsoever -- the legislation stipulates that they must complete a food processor course and label their products. Vendors of homemade goods (those buying from the treatmaker to sell to the public) may also require health inspections and health department registration, but even with these regulations, the cost of being a producer of homemade goods will go way down, and we're sure to see more homemade foods on the shelves and in restaurants. Look forward to even more delicious, local, tastes of Los Angeles.

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