6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
HvlSxHY-show-poster2x3-4ik43uV.png

Earth Focus

Start watching
5LQmQJY-show-poster2x3-MRWBpAK.jpg

Reporter Roundup

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

GOP Trying To Cut Food Stamps Further

Support Provided By
gopfoodstamps

Photo from cdevers

The news out of Washington, D.C. over the past few weeks could be summed up in three words: "Syria, Syria, Syria." And rightfully so, since any build-up to military action abroad should be debated and analyzed from every possible angle. But all the news coverage being focused on this one specific story has had an attention-diverting effect on other stories of equal importance, stories that will actually end up having a much more direct impact on our nation's citizens.

For example, while all of the talk's been focused on what we're going to end up doing in Syria, the GOP has been doing their darndest to get rid of a whole lot of America's food stamps: $40 billion in cuts over the next ten years, to be exact.

That's Billion with a B.

As Representative Barbara Lee from right here in California put it: "Republicans are introducing $40 billion in cuts to SNAP, our nation's most effective anti-hunger program, and they're hoping that our attention is split and Congress is focusing only on Syria."

Luckily, the New York Times took notice of this bold move by the House GOP and responded by penning a rare op-ed that really needs to be perused. A snippet:

The Cantor plan would force an estimated four to six million people to lose the food stamps that now sustain them. It would invite state governments to ratchet benefits back further because they could use savings wrenched from the pantries of the poor for various other programs, including tax cuts. The measure's "work requirements" provide no job training funds yet mandate that able-bodied, childless adults who cannot find at least part-time employment will lose their food stamps after 90 days, even if the local unemployment rate is prohibitively high.

This move comes as a whopping 15% of Americans currently utilize the SNAP program. It also comes, as The Atlantic points out, at a time when 5.7% of American households experience "very low food security," a term that means, according to the USDA, "normal eating patterns of one or more household members were disrupted and food intake was reduced at times during the year because they had insufficient money or other resources for food." In other words, not having enough money to eat.

What makes this even more troubling is the fact that this number (5.7%, it should be noted, equals just about 7 million Americans) is unchanged from the previous year. Meaning that despite the fact the nation's economy has reportedly been progressing in the right direction, it hasn't yet made an impact where it counts for a large portion of Americans: An ability to obtain food. Removing a substantial amount of funding to a program that specifically does this is, guess what, not going to alleviate the problem. That's like saying, "People need homes, so maybe we should fix this problem by putting an end to a program that creates houses. That's the ticket, everyone!"

The House vote on the bill is set for Thursday which, if passed, will have to then be reconciled by the Senate version of the bill, one that currently "only" cuts $4 billion from food stamps over the next decade. So, even with a landslide passage, there's plenty of steps to be taken before this massive cut becomes a reality.

Still: This is all a good time for a reminder to all left-wing pacifists currently incensed at the White House for their continuing advancement of another middling war overseas. Just remember, the only other option currently available to elect in our country is literally a group that's taking food off the plates of the poor.

Want recipes and food news emailed directly to you? Sign up for the new Food newsletter here!

Support Provided By
Read More
Close-up view of cherry blossoms in Little Tokyo.

Where to Find the Most Beautiful Blooming Trees in the L.A. Area

While L.A. may be more closely associated with palm trees lining its sidewalks and streets, this sprawling city and its surrounding municipalities is actually a horticultural delight of varied treescapes. Here are seven spots to get a glimpse of great blossoms.
A cup of ginjo sake paired with Tsubaki's kanpachi sashimi

Sake 101 Taught by Courtney Kaplan of Tsubaki and Ototo

Sake has existed for thousands of years. To help introduce and better understand this storied beverage, we turn to Courtney Kaplan, sommelier, sake aficionado and co-owner of restaurants Tsubaki and Ototo in Los Angeles.
An image of the French district in downtown Los Angeles. The image shows Aliso Street in downtown Los Angeles, California, with signs labeling buildings "Griffins Transfer and Storage Co." and "Cafe des Alpes" next to "Eden Hotel," which are located on opposite corners of Aliso and Alameda Streets. A Pacific Electric streetcar sign reads "Sierra Madre" and automobiles and horse-drawn wagons are seen in the dirt road.

What Cinco de Mayo Has to do with the French in Early L.A.

Cinco de Mayo is often celebrated wrongly as Mexican Independence Day, but a dig into the historical landscape of Los Angeles in the early 19th century reveals a complex relationship of French émigrés with a Mexican Los Angeles.