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Weekend Recipe: Gluten-Free Pizza

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Photo courtesy of America's Test Kitchen

Most gluten-free pizzas are dense and rubbery, but America's Test Kitchen has perfected its recipe to achieve an airy and tender crust. Now that you have a great base, go crazy on the toppings! Scroll below for some other tried and tested gluten-free recipes.

Gluten-Free Pizza
Makes two 12-inch pizzas

If you don't have almond flour, you can process 2 1/2 ounces of blanched almonds in a food processor until finely ground, about 30 seconds. Psyllium husk is available at health food stores. Note that parbaked and cooled crusts can sit at room temperature for up to 4 hours. Completely cooled crusts can be wrapped with plastic wrap and then aluminum foil and frozen for up to 2 weeks. Frozen crusts can be topped and baked as directed without thawing.

America's Test Kitchen Gluten-Free Flour Blend
Makes 42 ounces (about 9 1/3 cups)

Be sure to use potato starch, not potato flour. Tapioca starch is also sold as tapioca flour; they are interchangeable.

24 ounces (4 1/2 cups plus 1/3 cup) white rice flour
7 1/2 ounces (1 2/3 cups) brown rice flour
7 ounces (1 1/3 cups) potato starch
3 ounces (3/4 cup) tapioca starch
3/4 ounce (3 tablespoons) nonfat milk powder

Crust

  • 16 ounces (3 1/3 cups plus 1/4 cup) ATK Gluten-Free Flour Blend
  • 2 1/2 ounces (1/2 cup plus 1 tablespoon) almond flour
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons powdered psyllium husk
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 teaspoon instant or rapid-rise yeast
  • 2 1/2 cups warm water (100 degrees)
  • 1/4 cup vegetable oil
  • Vegetable oil spray

Sauce

  • 1 (28-ounce) can whole peeled tomatoes, drained
  • 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1 teaspoon red wine vinegar
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 1 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon pepper

Cheese topping

  • 1 ounce Parmesan cheese, grated fine (1/2 cup)
  • 8 ounces whole-milk mozzarella cheese, shredded (2 cups)

For the crust: Using stand mixer fitted with paddle, mix flour blend, almond flour, psyllium, baking powder, salt, and yeast on low speed until combined. Slowly add warm water and oil in steady stream until incorporated. Increase speed to medium and beat until dough is sticky and uniform, about 6 minutes. The dough will resemble thick batter.
Remove bowl from mixer, cover with plastic wrap, and let stand until inside of dough is bubbly (use spoon to peer inside dough), about 1 1/2 hours. The dough will puff slightly but will not rise.

Adjust oven racks to middle and lower positions. Line 2 rimmed baking sheets with parchment paper and spray liberally with oil spray. Transfer half of dough to center of 1 prepared sheet. Using oil-sprayed rubber spatula, spread dough into 8-inch circle. Spray top of dough with oil spray, cover with large sheet of plastic, and, using your hands, press out dough to 11 1/2-inch round, about 1/4 inch thick, leaving outer 1/4 inch slightly thicker than center; discard plastic. Repeat with remaining dough and second prepared sheet.

Place prepared sheets in oven preheated to 325 degrees. Bake dough until firm to touch, golden brown on underside, and just beginning to brown on top, 45 to 50 minutes, switching and rotating sheets halfway through baking. Transfer crusts to wire rack and let cool.

For the sauce: Process all ingredients in food processor until smooth, about 30 seconds. Transfer to bowl and refrigerate until ready to use.

One hour before baking pizza, adjust oven rack to upper-middle position, set baking stone on rack, and heat oven to 500 degrees.

Transfer 1 parbaked crust to pizza peel. Using back of spoon or ladle, spread 1/2 cup tomato sauce in thin layer over surface of crust, leaving 1/4-inch border around edge. Sprinkle 1/4 cup Parmesan evenly over sauce, followed by 1 cup mozzarella. Carefully slide crust onto stone and bake until crust is well browned and cheese is bubbly and beginning to brown, 10 to 12 minutes. Transfer pizza to wire rack and let cool for 5 minutes before slicing and serving. Repeat with second crust, 1/2 cup tomato sauce (you will have extra sauce), remaining 1/4 cup Parmesan, and remaining 1 cup mozzarella.

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