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Weekend Recipe: Grandma Pizza

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Homemade pizza dough is one of those items that seems intimidating to the beginning home cook. This recipe from KCET show Cook's Country simplifies the process by proofing the dough in the same pan you'll bake in. The toppings in a Grandma pizza are quite simple too -- give yourself enough time to let the dough rise, but rest assured this recipe is beautifully uncomplicated.

Photo courtesy Cook's Country
Photo courtesy Cook's Country

Grandma Pizza
Serves 4
Dough
3 tablespoons olive oil
3/4 cup water
1 1/2 cups (8 1/4 ounces) bread flour
2 1/4 teaspoons instant or rapid-rise yeast
1 teaspoon sugar
3/4 teaspoon salt

Topping
1(28-ounce) can diced tomatoes
1 tablespoon olive oil
2 garlic cloves, minced
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/4 teaspoon salt
8 ounces mozzarella cheese, shredded (2 cups)
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
2 tablespoons chopped fresh basil

Coat rimmed baking sheet with 2 tablespoons oil. Combine water and remaining 1 tablespoon oil in 1-cup liquid measuring cup. Using stand mixer fitted with dough hook, mix flour, yeast, sugar, and salt on low speed until combined. With mixer running, slowly add water mixture and mix until dough comes together, about 1 minute. Increase speed to medium-low and mix until dough is smooth and comes away from sides of bowl, about 10 minutes.

Transfer dough to greased baking sheet and turn to coat. Stretch dough to 10 by 6-inch rectangle. Cover with plastic wrap and let rise in warm place until doubled in size, 1 to 1½ hours. Stretch dough to corners of pan, cover loosely with plastic, and let rise in warm place until slightly puffed, about 45 minutes. (If the dough snaps back when you press it to the corners of the baking sheet, cover it, let it rest for 10 minutes, and try again.) Meanwhile, adjust oven rack to lowest position and heat oven to 500 degrees.

Place tomatoes in colander and drain well. Combine drained tomatoes, oil, garlic, oregano, and salt in bowl. Combine mozzarella and Parmesan in second bowl. Sprinkle cheese mixture over dough, leaving ½-inch border around edges. Top with tomato mixture and bake until well browned and bubbling, about 15 minutes. Slide pizza onto wire rack, sprinkle with basil, and let cool for 5 minutes. Serve.

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