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Weekend Recipe: Cracker Jack Ice Cream Cake

Cracker Jack Ice Cream Cake
Cook's Country

Celebrate the baseball season with this crunchy and salty peanut butter-caramel swirl ice cream cake from Cook's Country.

The prize hidden inside this refreshing cake is peanut butter–caramel swirl ice cream, which pairs perfectly with the cake’s namesake treat.

Cracker Jack Ice Cream Cake
Serves 8 to 10

INGREDIENTS

½ cup caramel topping
¼ cup peanut butter
1 ½ quarts vanilla ice cream
½ cup unsalted dry-roasted peanut, chopped
1 (9-inch) white cake round
2 (1-ounce) boxes Cracker Jack

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INSTRUCTIONS

1. FOR THE ICE CREAM CORE: Line 3-cup bowl with plastic wrap, letting ends of plastic overhang bowl by several inches. Combine caramel and peanut butter in small bowl; set aside. Scoop 2 cups ice cream into medium bowl and mash with wooden spoon until softened. Stir in peanuts until combined. Add ¼ cup caramel mixture and fold until swirled into ice cream. Scrape into plastic-lined bowl and smooth top. Wrap with plastic and freeze until firm, about 6 hours.

2. TO ASSEMBLE: Line 10-cup bowl with plastic, letting ends of plastic overhang bowl by several inches. Scoop remaining 4 cups ice cream into medium bowl and mash with wooden spoon until softened. Scrape softened ice cream into plastic-lined 10-cup bowl. Working quickly, unwrap caramel-swirled ice cream, discard plastic and press, round side down, into softened ice cream until flush with level of ice cream. Place cake round over top, trimming sides as necessary so cake fits inside bowl. Wrap with plastic and freeze until completely firm, about 6 hours.

3. TO SERVE: When ready to serve, unmold and discard plastic. Place cake side down on plate or pedestal. Drizzle remaining caramel mixture over top, then mound Cracker Jack in center. Serve immediately.

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