6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
Earth Focus

Earth Focus

Start watching
5LQmQJY-show-poster2x3-MRWBpAK.jpg

Reporter Roundup

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

Arrival Story: Edgar Arceneaux

Support Provided By

KCET Departures asks, "What's your or your family's Los Angeles arrival story?"

Today, we hear from artist and Watts House Project executive director, Edgar Arceneaux:

"My grandfather, Edgar Don Young, migrated to Los Angeles in 1923, from Greensboro, Mississippi.

"He rode here on the train like everybody else at the time and he tried to make a way for himself. He was a self-taught painter and an inventor. He was able to buy his own home and rise five kids.

"My grandfather had only had a sixth-grade education. He was able to do a lot through perseverance, commitment and ingenuity. He had a lot of different jobs. He was a street sweeper for many years - literally a guy who walked with a broom and a barrel.

"He was part of that first significant wave of African Americans from the south who were looking for a better life. Conditions in Mississippi hadn't really improved at all for blacks, and Los Angeles was that great city that folks could go to and follow their dreams.

"Plus, with World War I (and World War II), you had tens of thousands of blacks who were among the hundreds of thousands of people who were migrating to Los Angeles from all over the country, all over the world, really.

"Los Angeles was a place he could imagine new possibilities, become an artist, have some freedom, buy property, get a job, call a place his own, be able to raise his family, be in a community that cared about him and be loved.

"The first home that he bought was in South Central, Los Angeles, same as for many folks like him, migrants moving from the south. That house was not too far from where I grew up. I might have seen it once, but I never got a chance to know my grandfather. He died a couple of months before I was born, so I was named after him. I grew up with his works around the house, his paintings on the wall. So my road began there."

-- Edgar Arceneaux
(as told to Jeremy Rosenberg)

[view:kl_discussion_promote==]

Support Provided By
Read More
Chiqui Diaz at work advocating to end social isolation | Courtesy of Chiqui Diaz

Youth Leaders Making a Difference Honored by The California Endowment

The Youth Awards was created in 2018 to recognize the impact youth voices have in creating change throughout California. Learn more about the positive work they're accomplishing throughout the state.
A 2011 crime scene in Tulare County, where one of Jose Martinez's victims was found. | Courtesy of Marion County Sherff’s Office via FOIA/Buzzfeed

California's Unincorporated Places Can Be Poor, Powerless — and the Perfect Place to Commit Murder

It's time to do better by communities that don’t even have local police to call, let alone defund.
Protesters confront police outside the 3rd Police Precinct on May 27, 2020 in Minneapolis, Minnesota after the George Floyd killing | Stephen Maturen/Getty Images

In California, A History of Young, Powerful Voices in Journalism Emerge

In the Golden State, the youth have a long history of storytelling that uncovers little-heard narratives.