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'Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy' Serves Up Comfort Food at the Virtual KCET Cinema Series on May 20

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Q&A immediately following with director and producer Elizabeth Carroll.

Master chef, teacher, writer and gastronomic anthropologist Diana Kennedy has become one of the most celebrated culinary legends of Mexican cuisine. At barely five feet tall, the British ex-pat has been living off the grid in Michoacán since the 1970s researching and documenting the regional flavors of Mexico. A nonagenarian with a zest for life, she has also been fighting unapologetically for change in the environment to produce and sustain fresh food for future generations…staying true to herself every step of the way.

Featuring extensive interviews with Diana herself along with famed chefs José Andrés, Rick Bayless, Gabriela Cámara and Alice Waters, “Diana Kennedy: Nothing Fancy” provides an intimate and colorful look at the charismatic leading expert on Mexican dishes. The author of nine acclaimed cookbooks and a two-time James Beard Award winner, Diana is often called the “Julia Child of Mexico” but the feisty cook prefers to think of herself as “The Mick Jagger of Mexican Cuisine.”

Director and producer Elizabeth Carroll shared, “Diana is a tenacious force whose unconventional life story, defined by six decades of cooking and researching in Mexico, remains largely unknown. At 96, she urges immediate action in the fight against climate change, highlighting the importance of chefs’ roles in that fight. I’m hopeful the film will allow Diana’s legacy to be filed alongside the world’s culinary greats and next to the women of our present and past who have forged the paths they wanted to walk.”

The film screens on Wednesday, 7 p.m. PDT. Only $10 per viewing link. Limited space available.

To sign up, click here.

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