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Ethan Hawke Gives an Electric Performance in 'Tesla' at the Virtual KCET Cinema Series on August 19

Q&A immediately following with director Michael Almereyda.

Brilliant visionary Nikola Tesla (Ethan Hawke) fights an uphill battle to bring his revolutionary electrical system to fruition, then faces thornier challenges with his new system for worldwide wireless energy. The film tracks Tesla’s uneasy interactions with his fellow inventor Thomas Edison (Kyle MacLachlan) and his patron George Westinghouse (Jim Gaffigan).  Another thread traces Tesla’s sidewinding courtship of financial titan J.P. Morgan (Donnie Keshawarz), whose daughter Anne (Eve Hewson) takes a more than casual interest in the inventor. Anne analyzes and presents the story as it unfolds, offering a distinctly modern voice to this scientific period drama.

Hawke shared, “There's something about Nikola Tesla that needs to be discussed right now. More and more it seems like the event of our age is the internet and the massive impact it’s having changing borders and the way we think. It all goes back to this age of invention and Nikola Tesla, so it seems like it's a great time to revisit this period when wireless energy came onto the scene. This story spoke to me. When Michael first told me about Nikola Tesla, I thought, ‘I want to know about this, I wish I knew more. It seems relevant to my life and I have no idea where wireless energy came from.’ People think someone like Steve Jobs created wireless energy and they don't understand the legacy of invention and the Industrial Age. So, telling that story excited me.”

Immediately following the screening, Deadline’s chief film critic Pete Hammond, who can also be seen on KCET’s Must See Movies, will moderate a Q&A with director Michael Almereyda.

The film screens on Wednesday, Aug. 19 at 7 p.m. PDT. Only $10 per viewing link. Limited space available.

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