6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
Earth Focus

Earth Focus

Start watching
5LQmQJY-show-poster2x3-MRWBpAK.jpg

Reporter Roundup

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

'Trans Pecos' Is a Cautionary Tale About Land and Water Rights at the Virtual KCET Cinema Series on July 8

Support Provided By

Q&A immediately following with Nicol Ragland (director and producer) Anna Rau (producer) and Corbett Jones (producer, director of photography and editor).

The film documents the impact of the Trans-Pecos Pipeline during the two years of its construction, as oil and gas interests trample on land and water rights and endanger residents along 148 miles in West Texas. As a beautifully rendered cautionary tale, it asks viewers to contemplate not just this specific incident, but the broader meaning of nature and the question of proprietorship.

Director and producer Nicol Ragland shared, “Protecting the rights of the land has now become a health imperative. Private companies taking land for private gain not only violates basic property rights but invades ecological systems, violates the integrity of species and contributes to industrializing our world by exploiting land for profit. The characters we followed within the region of the Big Bend in far West Texas represent a boundless relationship to place. These voices along with an insider who sheds light on the nature of the political system that allows a pipeline to steal 41 landowners land without due process is our story and timely intervention. We look forward to sharing the film along with furthering the collective effort in protecting land and human rights.”

Immediately following the screening, Deadline’s chief film critic Pete Hammond, who can also be seen on KCET’s Must See Movies, will moderate a Q&A with Ragland as well as Anna Rau (producer) and Corbett Jones (producer, director of photography and editor). Ragland is a successful photographer and filmmaker based in Jones, Oklahoma who has spent time with Indigenous people around the world. Through stories and imagery that evoke humanity while advocating for social justice, Raglan aligns her creative work to push boundaries and bridge differences, and serve numerous international non-profit organizations. Rau is a creative producer and co-founder of The Range, a creative production company based in Austin, Texas. Her work has included feature-length documentary and narrative works as well as award-winning commercials for National Geographic, VICE Media, and Atlantic Records, among others. Jones is a co-founder with Anna Rau of The Range, and lives in Austin, Texas. He received a Golden Mike Award in 2020 for his cinematography on the KCET/PBS environmental series “Tending Nature,” and a 2017 Emmy Award as a producer on the “Third L.A. with Architecture Critic Christopher Hawthorne” episode of "Artbound" on KCET. His freelance work has taken him around the world, for clients such as Apple, Cartier, Chevrolet and Spotify.

The film screens on Wednesday, July 8 at 7 p.m. PDT. Only $10 per viewing link. Limited space available.

To sign up, click here.

Support Provided By
Read More
CityofGhosts_Season1_Episode5_00_13_53_04_1778127.jpg

Animated Series 'City of Ghosts' Explores L.A.'s Rich Histories for Kids

Award-winning animator Elizabeth Ito explores L.A.'s rich, diverse history in a hybrid documentary and animated series, "City of Ghosts
A black, square-shaped piece of fabric with chain stitch embroidery reading the words, "BLACK LIVES MATTER" in white thread. The ends of the threads are long and loose. The patch sits on top of a multicolored, striped surface.

When Embroidery Stitches a Portrait of Our Times

These L.A. artists have been using the craft of embroidery to send messages of hope, renewal and justice. With designs inspired by the Black Lives Matter movement and the presidential inauguration, their pieces have become a way to protest and record history.
A man (left) and a woman (right) in masks work in a woodshop with coronavirus safety regulations in place such as clear plastic barriers between stations.

Report: Reducing Red Tape Key to Survival of L.A.’s Creative Economy

After record growth, L.A.'s creative economy has suffered much with the coronavirus crisis. Now, recovery is uneven, and experts say reducing red tape is a critical element of survival.