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Will Smith's 'King Richard' Brings the KCET Cinema Series Back to the Aero Theatre on Nov. 2

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KING RICHARD – Official Trailer

Q&A immediately following screening with Tim White (championship tennis player) and Trevor White.

Based on the true story, this biographic drama follows the journey of Richard Williams (Will Smith). Driven by a clear vision of the future for his daughters and using unconventional methods, Richard has a plan to take Venus (Saniyya Sidney) and Serena (Demi Singleton) from Compton to the global stage and, in the process, change professional tennis.

For the film's star and producer Will Smith, the story of "King Richard" is a story of "The impossible dream. For the most part, we all have impossible dreams. We have things that we would do if we felt that they were possible, things we would do if we believed. The story of Richard and this family is largely the American dream. There are very few places on earth where Venus and Serena could happen. At the core, this is about wanting to be the best versions of ourselves and sometimes, our circumstances may not line up with that, and it's up to the strength of the human spirit to overpower circumstances. It's wish fulfillment for all of us."

Immediately following the screening, Deadline's chief film critic Pete Hammond, who can also be seen on KCET's Must See Movies, moderated a Q&A with Tim White (championship tennis player) and Trevor White.

Listen to the Q&A from the screening below.

The long-running in-person series returns in November to the historic Aero Theatre in Santa Monica, while the popular virtual series continues on Eventive, a technology platform designed specifically to enhance the online film viewing experience.

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