Key Art of "Summer of Rockets" featuring Keeley Hawes and Toby Stephens.

Summer of Rockets

Start watching
6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
FZG3mkG-show-poster2x3-nOossfs.png

SoCal Update

Start watching
Death in Paradise Series 10

Death in Paradise

Start watching
millionaire still

KCET Must See Movies

Start watching
MZihTLV-show-poster2x3-5CKaGu8.jpg

Independent Lens

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
HvlSxHY-show-poster2x3-4ik43uV.png

Earth Focus

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

Are Your Children Addicted to Smart Phones and Other Screens?

Support Provided By
children-iphone-addiction

 

This week is Screen-Free Week, an annual effort by children's advocates to get kids free from the grip of electronic devices, even if only for a few days. Started in 1996 as "TV Turnoff," it's now hosted by the Campaign for Commercial Free Childhood (CCFC) and promoted by hundreds of groups around the country.

The idea behind Screen-Free Week is to get kids' noses out of Nintendos, Play Stations, smart phones, tablets, and TVs and get them to read, explore nature, and spend time with friends and family.

According to Dr. Susan Linn, director of the CCFC, when her group took over hosting "TV Turnoff" week three years ago, they changed the name because TV wasn't the only "bad guy" anymore.

"It's not even that screens are necessarily 'bad guys' -- except for babies -- but it's just that there's too much of them in our lives and way too much of them in children's lives, and it's important to take a break," she declared.

Some studies show that on average, American preschoolers spend 32 hours a week enthralled by screened entertainment, the CCFC reported.

Linn said that when families are out with restless kids at restaurants and other public places, mobile screens are too often shoved in the children's faces by their parents, to try to keep them quiet.

"They could bring books, or they could bring crayons, little things that will occupy them if it's really too hard for them to sit for long periods of time" she suggested.

Adults are also encouraged to take the pledge to swear off TV or DVDs for a week, and only use the computer if it's required for work.

To take the pledge, and to get more information and materials, more information can be found here. Yes, you'll have to use a screen one more time, but you and your children may be better off for it.

Story by Lori Abbott, PNS

Support Provided By
Read More
Black Lives Matter supporters march through downtown Los Angeles on the first anniversary of George Floyd's death on Tuesday, May 25, 2021.

Los Angeles, Sacramento Announce Reparations Coalition on Juneteenth

Mayors, including Los Angeles and Sacramento, form reparations and equity coalition on new federal holiday to push for national reparations. L.A. Mayor Eric Garcetti also announces the formation of an advisory committee, paving the way for a local reparations pilot project.
An asphalt surface is covered in various encampments. A boy is walking across the frame.

'It's a Mission': Volunteers Treat Migrants Massing at Border

A growing number of Mexican and Central American migrants are trying to cross into the U.S. at the southern border. Volunteers at one free clinic in Tijuana tend to the health needs of migrants waiting for their immigration cases to come up — and simply trying to survive in packed and dangerous encampments.
An older Vietnamese American woman practices self-defense moves on a volunteer.

How the #ProtectOurElders Movement Helped Create a Wave of First-Time Asian American Activists

A rise in attacks on Asian Americans has led to a burst of new groups. But what is their staying power?