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No Place Like Home: A Timeline of U.S. Coercion of Land and Property

this tract is exclusive
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The original documentary series, City Rising, set for release in fall, examines the historical roots, economic role, and social consequences of gentrification. City Rising illuminates the journey of Californian neighborhoods fighting gentrification and advocating for housing justice and responsible development. 

To understand the dramatic changes happening in many of our city centers including; private and public investment, demographic shifts, and the displacement of vibrant communities, we have to contextualize these changes in a larger history of land appropriation and a racialized real estate market. The timeline below, while not a complete list, provides national and regional examples to California of laws and practices that fundamentally shaped today's land use policies and housing markets. Although the right to land and property is at the core of American values, few in the United States have access to land ownership or quality housing. Particularly, working class people and people of color have disproportionately bore the brunt of urban renewal projects and a housing shortage throughout history. 

How can we build an equitable future if we don’t reconcile our past?

Top image: Sign in front of housing tract reading "This tract is exclusive and restricted," courtesy of California Eagle Photograph Collection, USC Library

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(LEFT) ER nurse Adwoa Blankson-Wood pictured near the start of the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, wearing scrubs and a surgical mask; By October, Blankson-Wood was required to don an N-95 mask, protective goggles, a head covering and full PPE to interact with patients.

As A Black Nurse at The Pandemic's Frontlines, I've Had A Close Look at America's Racial Divisions

Most of the time, I was able to frame conversations within the context of the virus and not race, telling patients that we were doing our best, trying to be the heroes they kept calling us. But I was dying inside .... It was easier to find solace in my job, easier to be just a nurse, than to be a Black nurse.
The City of L.A. is staging a COVID-19 mobile vaccination clinic in Chinatown for senior citizens, in an attempt to improve access to the vaccine among vulnerable populations.

Long-Awaited COVID-19 Vaccine Access Expanding in L.A. County Monday

Los Angeles County’s COVID-19 vaccination effort will expand vastly Monday, but health officials said today those workers will have to be patient as vaccine supplies remain limited and staff are trained to ensure only eligible people receive shots.
Photo from above of people waiting in line on a sidewalk.

COVID-19 Pushes Many Indian Employers to Grant Informal Employees New Work Benefits

Bank accounts, housing and fixed wages among new benefits being offered to some of India's vast army of informal workers.