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People of Cypress Park: Antonio Peña

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My name is Pepe Peña. And I am here at Morenita. We've been here about twenty-five years and the Morenita was kind of a landmark, because there were the ones that started selling tortillas to people like Safeway. We're in the middle of Cypress Park and it's a historic monument. We've served many people throughout the community for many, many years and we have made food for people like the President of the United States.

Cypress Park does not have a bank, it does not have a post office, okay? Yet, many years ago they wanted to take the library away from us and someway or other I got involved and the library now is across the street. Many years ago, they gave us money for the park, the park was going to be taken away, yet the community of Cypress Park fought for that park and now we have that park. Which many people come from all over the city of Los Angeles, even people from all over the world, come and play soccer.

At the moment now, they are building low income housing on San Fernando Road which should be ready twenty-thirteen, or twenty-fourteen, and then we'll have many, many, many more people in Cyprus Park, on this side of town.

Changes are definitely gonna happen. Probably much more traffic and hopefully better services. I would say this is gold property, it's gonna to be unable to be touched within a few years.

The above interview is transcribed and edited from the following interview:

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