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Bear Guerra

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Bear Guerra is a photographer whose work addresses globalization, development, and social and environmental justice issues. He was a 2014 Ted Scripps Fellow in Environmental Journalism at the University of Colorado-Boulder, and in 2012, was chosen as a Blue Earth Alliance photographer for his ongoing project La Carretera: Life Along Peru's Interoceanic Highway. He was a finalist for a National Magazine Award in Photojournalism in 2010, and in 2012 received honorable mention in the 2012 Photocrati Fund competition. His work has received funding from Mongabay, the International Reporting Project, Society of Environmental Journalists, Puffin Foundation, Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting, and the Christensen Fund/Project Word. In addition to editorial assignments, he often works on long-term projects, and collaborates with non-profit organizations working for human rights and on environmental issues. His photo essays and images have been published and exhibited widely, both in the United States and abroad, in publications such as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Le Monde, The Atlantic, Orion, ProPublica, National Public Radio, BBC, O Magazine, Ms., and many others.

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Buildings just east of the Bowtie are occupied by media arts businesses and artists. Had a proposed development plan from the late-1990s succeeded, a much larger “LA Media Tech Center” would  have transformed the former rail yard | Photo by Bear Guerra
Article
Artbound

Designing Open Space in the Bowtie to Reflect the L.A. River Today

Urban ecologist Kat Superfisky describes L.A. as a “come-one, come-all kind of a place,” where we do a great job of living amongst one another. But the next step will be to figure out how our public spaces, including the Bowtie, can reflect that.
The old roundhouse at the southern tip of the Bowtie is a popular proving ground for local street artists | Photo by Bear Guerra
Article
Artbound

The Bowtie Offers a Rare Refuge Along the L.A. River

The Bowtie is a popular place to find refuge in. That could change in the not-too-distant future, once the site is cleaned up and landscaped.
A neighborhood street scene | Photo by Bear Guerra
Article
Artbound

The Bowtie Parcel’s Next-Door Neighbors

Being neighbors with an abandoned railyard frequented by gangsters had helped keep prices down in the Pocket — a small neighborhood wedged between Fletcher Drive and the 2 Freeway. But that’s all changing now.
A swallow flies over a large Mule Fat bush in the Bowtie Parcel
Article
Artbound

Frogtown Without Frogs: The Changing Ecology of the Bowtie Parcel and the L.A. River

Most of the L.A. River’s 51 miles flows through a concrete flood control channel that was built in the 1940s and 1950s, but in this section, next to the Bowtie and Frogtown, the river is very much alive despite the surrounding infrastructure.
Sergio Herrara Walks Through Bowtie
Article
Artbound

The L.A. River Reimagined: A Demolished Rail Yard Brings New Life to the Bowtie Parcel

The Los Angeles River, and the Bowtie Parcel next to it offer a lens through which we can think about how Los Angeles used to be, how it is today, and how it may evolve tomorrow.
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