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Artbound

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Tending Nature

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Southland Sessions

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Earth Focus

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Reporter Roundup

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City Rising

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Lost LA

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Debra Utacia Krol

Debra Krol

Debra Utacia Krol is an award-winning journalist with an emphasis on Native issues, environmental and science issues and travel. She is an enrolled member of the Xolon (also known as Jolon) Salinan Tribe from the Central California coastal ranges. Her forceful and deeply reported stories about peoples, places and issues have won nearly a dozen awards. Follow Krol on
Twitter: @debkrol or Muck Rack

Debra Krol
Aerial shot of Potawot Community Garden. | Still from "Tending Nature"
Article
Tending Nature

At Potawot Community Garden the Health of the Land Equals the Health of the People

The land now known as Ku’wah-dah-wilth Restoration Area is a place of wellness, of healing, of cultural resiliency and it’s a wellspring of Indigenous food sovereignty. 
tending nature triba lhunting luis alvarez pit river
Article
Tending Nature

Tribe Acts to Restore Hunting Practices and Traditional Food Source

Alarmed over the decline of a traditional food source, the Pit River Tribe acts to restore grasslands and traditional hunting practices.
Rosa Maria Morales Domingeuz making a necua craft store doll | Rose Ramirez
Article
Artbound

Borders and Baskets: How the Creation of Borders Changed Kumeyaay Life

Because of a random border drawn across their lands, the Kumeyaay people find their tribe torn asunder. Despite of great challenges, they are keeping the art of basket weaving alive as a act of resilience and creativity.
 Naomi Whitehorse and Giselle Fontanelli wearing Leah Mata's creations | Courtesy of Leah Mata
Article
Artbound

It Takes Years to Create Chumash Regalia. Here's Why.

Using materials gathered from natural sources, artist Leah Mata, a member of the Northern Chumash Tribe, has been creating Chumash regalia and accessories. Her work sheds light into the delicate balance required to make art out of nature.
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