Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Discover all the ways you can make a difference.
Support Icon
The Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams are here to help.
Support Provided By

James Rojas

jrojas

James Rojas is an urban planner, community activist, artist and has developed an innovative method of community engagement using art making. He has collaborated with municipalities, non-profits, and educational institutions, and museums to engage, educate and empower the public on urban planning.  He holds a Master of City Planning from the MIT.

jrojas
elysian park
Article
Lost LA

Elysian Park: A Plaza Set in Nature

Urban planner James Rojas recounts the role of Elysian Park in the Mexican-American experience.
Boogie on Down to Gino's
Article
Lost LA

From the Eastside to Hollywood: Chicano Queer Trailblazers in 1970s L.A.

In the late 1970, young gay men from the Eastside found their identity on the disco dance floors of Hollywood.
Bobby Herman news collage
Article
Lost LA

My Grandfather, Boxing Champ of L.A.’s Eastside

Boxing halls were once as numerous as movie theaters in Los Angeles, and a young Mexican-American prize fighter named Bobby Herman was among the star attractions.
Boyle Heights Family.jpg
Article
Lost LA

A Place Erased

Urban planner James Rojas, who coined the term "Latino Urbanism," reflects on the loss of his family compound in Boyle Heights.
Dancing at Studio One in West Hollywood
Article
Lost LA

The Birth of Gay Urbanism in 1970s West Hollywood

"Gay Urbanism" transformed West Hollywood into a place that reflected gays' and lesbians' cultural identity.
chicanoartist
Article
Artbound

Why Urban Planners Should Work With Artists

Artists can be instrumental to transforming urban planning on L.A.'s Eastside.
mariachiplaza01.jpg
Article

Looking for the Rasquache at Mariachi Plaza in Boyle Heights

How has Mariachi Plaza changed in the last 25 years, as a public space as well as a place for redevelopment?
eastlaurbanism02.jpg
Article

How the Civil Rights Movement Shaped Latino Urbanism in East L.A.

The Latino quest for cultural identity parallels the African-American Civil Rights Movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s, which has its genesis in protests -- many of which were carried out in public spaces.
James Rojas at work on an interactive model.
Article
Departures

Los Angeles in Maps: What's Next?

Los Angeles is no longer being shaped by infrastructure and development. Today, L.A. is being transformed by ethnic and cultural diversity.
Active loading indicator