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Marissa López

Marissa López

Marissa López is Professor of English and Chicana/o Studies at UCLA, researching Chicanx literature from the 19th century to the present with an emphasis on 19th-century Mexican California. She is the author of "Chicano Nations" (NYU 2011) and "Racial Immanence" (NYU 2019), and recently completed a year-long residency at the Los Angeles Public Library as a Scholars & Society fellow with the American Council of Learned Societies. Together with the LAPL Professor López is developing a mobile app, "Picturing Mexican America," that uses geodata to display images of Mexican California relevant to a user's location.

Marissa López
An image of the French district in downtown Los Angeles. The image shows Aliso Street in downtown Los Angeles, California, with signs labeling buildings "Griffins Transfer and Storage Co." and "Cafe des Alpes" next to "Eden Hotel," which are located on opposite corners of Aliso and Alameda Streets. A Pacific Electric streetcar sign reads "Sierra Madre" and automobiles and horse-drawn wagons are seen in the dirt road.
Article
Lost LA

What Cinco de Mayo Has to do with the French in Early L.A.

Cinco de Mayo is often celebrated wrongly as Mexican Independence Day, but a dig into the historical landscape of Los Angeles in the early 19th century reveals a complex relationship of French émigrés with a Mexican Los Angeles.
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