Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Discover all the ways you can make a difference.
Support Icon
The Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams are here to help.
Support Provided By

Nadra Nittle

Nadra Nittle

Nadra Nittle is a Los Angeles-based journalist. She has written for LAist, The Atlantic, Vox Media and many other publications. 

Nadra Nittle
Fries and hot dogs served at Earle's. | Still from "Broken Bread"
Article
Broken Bread

5 Vegetarian Favorites in Crenshaw from a Vegan Chef

Chef Sharde Whitt shares her favorite spots in and around the Crenshaw District to get food from brick-and-mortar restaurants to food trucks.
Amelia Keeling, a woman with long braids, sets a plate of food down at a table. Chuck D sits on the left side wearing a black cap with the letter "D" embroidered on it. Roy Choi sits to the right wearing a black beanie. The table is in an outdoor dining location with a green neon light illuminating the scene.
Article
Broken Bread

5 Easy Ways to Support Black-Owned Businesses

Want African American-owned restaurants in Southern California to thrive during the pandemic and beyond? You can take a number of easy steps to lend your support whether you're in Los Angeles or further afield.
A woman breathes out as white doves fly in the mural "Our Mighty Contribution"
Article
Artbound

The Great Wall of Crenshaw and the Ongoing Story of Black Los Angeles

Since the 1990s, Los Angeles has become less African American, as a way to hold onto their cultural integrity, Black Angelenos have turned to public art to help tell their ongoing story.
Chloe Arnold is photographed professionally wearing a leather-like top and red pants.
Article
Artbound

A Dancer for Justice: Chloe Arnold Connects Youth to their Humanity Through Movement

Emmy-nominated tap dancer Chloe Arnold credits dance for saving her life. Now, she is paying it forward by offering inner-city youth an opportunity to connect with themselves and others through dance.
Three pink squares on a billboard have three images drawn onto them. The one on the far left is a portrait of Chef Visoth Tarak Ouk, widely known as "Chef T." He's wearing a T-shirt and a baseball cap proudly flashing a tattoo on his fingers that reads "Chef Life." In the middle box is an unsmiling baby girl propped up by an adult hand, her name written on a mugshot letter board. On the right box is a man with his head tilted and the same surname as the baby girl.
Article
Southland Sessions

Socio-Political Art is Popping Up on Billboards Across L.A. Here's What They're All About.

In its seventh year, this year's Billboard Creative project highlights the work of established and emerging artists on 30 billboards across L.A. This year's curated collection features pieces that address issues such as immigration, the environment, race, gender and domestic violence.
A man (left) and a woman (right) in masks work in a woodshop with coronavirus safety regulations in place such as clear plastic barriers between stations.
Article
Southland Sessions

Report: Reducing Red Tape Key to Survival of L.A.’s Creative Economy

After record growth, L.A.'s creative economy has suffered much with the coronavirus crisis. Now, recovery is uneven, and experts say reducing red tape is a critical element of survival.
Artist Teresa Tolliver and her installation at a William Grant Still Art Center Black Doll Show, circa 87-90 | Bobbie Campbell, Courtesy of William Grant Still Art Center
Article
Southland Sessions

40 Years Later, Why a Black Doll Show Still Resonates

Celebrating its 40th year, William Grant Still Arts Center’s annual Black doll show uses dolls to examine the complexities of being Black and work toward healing.
Rosie Lee Hooks | Courtesy of Watts Towers Arts Center
Article
Artbound

Advocate Above All: Watts Towers Art Center's Rosie Lee Hooks 

From performing with an ensemble to working at the Smithsonian to mentoring Watts youth (including a young Nipsey Hussle), WTAC's advocate has done it all and keeps fighting for her adopted neighborhood.
Les Uniques Social Club initiation ceremony of new officers at the Buckman home in Santa Monica, 1954. | Persil Lewis. Courtesy of the Quinn Research Center
Article
Southland Sessions

Three Major Projects Chronicle Histories and Displacement of African Americans in Santa Monica

“We get it all the time — people come up to us and say, ‘We didn't know that Black people live in Santa Monica,” Carolyne Edwards said. “And there was a huge population there.”
A gloved hand holds an envelope in Sean Griffith's contribution to Susan Silton's "Mayday! Mayday! Mayday!" project | Courtesy of Susan Silton
Article
Southland Sessions

Susan Silton’s ‘“Mayday! Mayday! Mayday!’ Shines the Light on COVID Victims While Supporting Postal System

“If we’re not able to deliver body bags to this president, let’s deliver bags of handwritten names of those we’ve lost,” Susan Silton’s ‘“Mayday! Mayday! Mayday!” project websites states.
Active loading indicator