Artbound

Artbound

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Fine Cut

Fine Cut

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SoCal Wanderer

SoCal Wanderer

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a large damn with graffiti of a woman with a hammer on it, mountains in the background

Earth Focus Presents

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Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali

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Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

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Professor T

Professor T (Belgium)

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Emma

Emma

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Guilt

Guilt

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Line of Separation Key Art.

Line of Separation

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Us

Us

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The Latino Experience

The Latino Experience

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Key Art of "Summer of Rockets" featuring Keeley Hawes and Toby Stephens.

Summer of Rockets

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Death in Paradise Series 10

Death in Paradise

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KCET Must See Movies

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Independent Lens

Independent Lens

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Tending Nature
New Special Airing Nov. 14

Tending Nature

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Earth Focus

Earth Focus

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City Rising

City Rising

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Lost LA

Lost LA

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Nathan Masters

Nathan Masters (2018)

Nathan Masters is host and executive producer of Lost L.A., an Emmy Award-winning public television series from KCET and the USC Libraries. The show explores how rare artifacts from Southern California's archives can unlock hidden and often-surprising stories from the region's past. Nathan’s writing has appeared in many publications, including Los Angeles Magazine and the Los Angeles Times. He also helps manage public programs and media initiatives at the USC Libraries, home to the L.A. as Subject research consortium.

Nathan Masters (2018)
 A map of Los Angeles City, 1867.
Article
Lost LA

The Convoluted Logic of L.A.'s Numbered Avenues

As Los Angeles expanded, a need to clear up confusion for citizens came when duplicate numbered streets and avenues appeared throughout the city.
A mountain range, parts of which are covered in snow.
Article
Lost LA

The Lost Plan to Create a National Park in L.A.’s Backyard

In 1916, the proposed establishment of the Sierra Madre National Park laid in the hands of conservationist Stephen Mather. But an underfunded national park system and the area's lack of "nationally significant" monumental scenery meant a swift end to the plan.
An archival black-and-white photo of Edgar Lucien Larkin inside the Lowe Observatory on Echo Mountain.
Article
Lost LA

Edgar Lucien Larkin: The Wizard of Echo Mountain

Edgar Lucien Larkin came to Southern California in 1900 to work the Lowe Observatory's 16-inch refracting telescope and discuss science with tourists. But what made him stand out and draw crowds up the mountain night after night was the way he explained astronomy as a kind of magic, bridging ancient mystery and modern science.
chutes park distant.jpg
Article
Lost LA

When the Los Angeles Angels Played Ball Inside an Amusement Park

Discover the Angels' humble beginnings as a then-minor-league club playing out of Chutes Park, an all-dirt stadium part of a larger family entertainment center that included attractions like bowling alleys and an 85-foot-tall water ride.
1961 artist's rendering of LAX's Theme Building, designed by architect William Pereira. Courtesy of the California Historical Society Collection, USC Libraries.
Article

The Early History of L.A. International Airport

The transportation hub has hardly stood still since it emerged from the bean fields of Westchester in the late 1920s.
In conversation with original Imagineer Bob Gurr | Katie Noonan
Article
Lost LA

Lost LA Field Notes: Fantasyland

For the Fantasyland episode, I met an Imagineer, sat down with the director of the Walt Disney Archives and went through photos of Universal's original studio tour. We also visited the restaurant that inspired Walt Disney's fantasy theme.
Abbot Kinney's original plan for Venice of America. All the canals pictured here are now paved roads. Courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library Map Collection.
Article
Lost LA

Lost LA Field Notes: Venice

Venice has been in a state of perpetual renaissance since tobacco heir Abbot Kinney founded the seaside resort town in 1905. And yet traces of its past stubbornly persist in street names, artworks and the built environment.
In discussion with Zzyzx caretaker Jason Wallace | Katie Noonan
Article
Lost LA

​Lost LA Field Notes: Ghost Towns

The only ghosts in this episode are the dreams of the past — visions of wealth, of new cities, and of new ways of living that failed. One of our stops was at Zzyzx, where we found multiple layers of history baked under the desert sun.
In conversation with Dick Metz at the Surfing Heritage & Culture Center in San Clemente | Katie Noonan
Article
Lost LA

Lost LA Field Notes: Surf’s Up!

Before we made this episode, I didn’t realize how far surfing’s influence extended, even to my own childhood. Conversations with surf culture historians Dick Metz and Peter Westwick, and a visit to Muscle Beach, helped to tell the story.
Remnants of beach art at the Salton Sea
Article
Lost LA

Lost LA Field Notes: Desert Fantasy

Californians have learned to love their arid eastern lands. Joshua Tree continues to enjoy (or suffer from, depending on your perspective) record visitation. Music and art festivals draw hundreds of thousands more. For many, the desert is home.
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