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Ruxandra Guidi

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Ruxandra Guidi is a native of Caracas, Venezuela and has fifteen years of experience working in public radio, magazines, and multimedia, and has reported throughout the United States, the Caribbean, South and Central America, as well as Mexico and the US-Mexico border region. After earning an MA in Journalism from UC Berkeley, she worked as a reporter, editor, and producer for NPR's Latino USA, BBC's The World, CPB's Fronteras Desk in San Diego-Tijuana, and KPCC Public Radio's Immigration and Emerging Communities beat in Los Angeles. She's also reported extensively throughout South America, having been a freelance foreign correspondent in Bolivia (2007-2009) and Ecuador (2014-2016). She has produced in-depth magazine features, essays, and radio documentaries for the BBC World Service, National Public Radio, Marketplace, Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, National Geographic NewsWatch, The New York Times, The Guardian, and many other magazines and media organizations.

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Buildings just east of the Bowtie are occupied by media arts businesses and artists. Had a proposed development plan from the late-1990s succeeded, a much larger “LA Media Tech Center” would  have transformed the former rail yard | Photo by Bear Guerra
Article
Artbound

Designing Open Space in the Bowtie to Reflect the L.A. River Today

Urban ecologist Kat Superfisky describes L.A. as a “come-one, come-all kind of a place,” where we do a great job of living amongst one another. But the next step will be to figure out how our public spaces, including the Bowtie, can reflect that.
The old roundhouse at the southern tip of the Bowtie is a popular proving ground for local street artists | Photo by Bear Guerra
Article
Artbound

The Bowtie Offers a Rare Refuge Along the L.A. River

The Bowtie is a popular place to find refuge in. That could change in the not-too-distant future, once the site is cleaned up and landscaped.
A neighborhood street scene | Photo by Bear Guerra
Article
Artbound

The Bowtie Parcel’s Next-Door Neighbors

Being neighbors with an abandoned railyard frequented by gangsters had helped keep prices down in the Pocket — a small neighborhood wedged between Fletcher Drive and the 2 Freeway. But that’s all changing now.
A swallow flies over a large Mule Fat bush in the Bowtie Parcel
Article
Artbound

Frogtown Without Frogs: The Changing Ecology of the Bowtie Parcel and the L.A. River

Most of the L.A. River’s 51 miles flows through a concrete flood control channel that was built in the 1940s and 1950s, but in this section, next to the Bowtie and Frogtown, the river is very much alive despite the surrounding infrastructure.
Sergio Herrara Walks Through Bowtie
Article
Artbound

The L.A. River Reimagined: A Demolished Rail Yard Brings New Life to the Bowtie Parcel

The Los Angeles River, and the Bowtie Parcel next to it offer a lens through which we can think about how Los Angeles used to be, how it is today, and how it may evolve tomorrow.
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