6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
HvlSxHY-show-poster2x3-4ik43uV.png

Earth Focus

Start watching
5LQmQJY-show-poster2x3-MRWBpAK.jpg

Reporter Roundup

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.
Support Provided By

Samanta Helou Hernandez

Samanta Helou Hernandez

Samanta Helou Hernandez is a freelance multimedia journalist covering food, culture, music, and Latinx issues. Her work has been featured in publications such as LA Weekly, Mitú, and Remezcla among others. You can find her work at samantahelou.com.

Samanta Helou Hernandez
Panquetzani sits with new parents and their baby. | Samanta Helou Hernandez
Article
City Rising

Herbalists and Birth Workers Fill Gaps in Community Care

Working informally is challenging for birth workers and herbalists, but they are an important part of community care that is lacking within mainstream healthcare systems.
Reyna Garcia | Samanta Helou Hernandez
Article
City Rising

Voices of Resilience: Stories from Women Navigating Informal Labor

Many women immigrants are often forced into informal jobs that take advantage of their precarious situation, yet their contributions often go unrecognized and their labor is exploited and undervalued.
Pinata District street vendors | Samantha Helou Hernandez
Article
City Rising

Making it Official: How L.A. Street Vending Became Legal

After being criminalized for decades, street vending in Los Angeles has finally gained legitimacy thanks to an active community of fearless street vendors and their allies.
Gabriela Ruiz on the rooftop of her current working studio in Mexico City | Samanta Helou Hernandez
Article
Artbound

Gabriela Ruiz Is Young, Subversive and Forging Her Own Way in the Art World

With no formal art school training, multimedia artist Gabriela Ruiz is creating her own opportunities to forge a path in a famously stratified field.
"Bridges in Time of Walls" exhibition | Samanta Helou Hernandez
Article
Artbound

Interactive: A Chicanx Artist's Point of View

An exhibition in Mexico City titled “Bridges in a Time of Walls: Chicano/Mexican-American Art from L.A. to Mexico,” is introducing Mexicans to Chicano and Mexican-American art across generations and practices. We spoke to four participating artists.
 "Bridges in a Time of Walls" exhibition wide shot.  "Strewn" by Leticia Maldonando in the foreground with "Los Four 20th Anniversary Collective Mural" in the background. | Samanta Helou Hernandez
Article
Artbound

Rare Exhibit Brings Chicano Art to Mexico City

“Bridges in a Time of Walls: Mexican/Chicano Art from Los Angeles to Mexico” is a wide-ranging, multigenerational and rare exhibit of Chicano artwork in Mexico’s capital.
People on Olvera Street | Samanta Helou Hernandez Olvera AB s9
Article
Artbound

Hear the Voices of Olvera Street

Olvera Street means many things to many people. Hear the voices of those who find themselves drawn to this heart of Los Angeles.
Roberto Berrellza | Samanta Helou
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

He Was One of the First to Overcome Racial Bias in the Kitchens. Meet the Mexican Chef Who Helped Pave the Way.

When celebrated food critic Jonathan Gold first came across Chef Roberto Berrelleza’s now-shuttered La Moderna in 1992, he wrote, “La Moderna's food, prepared by a true restaurant maniac, is among the best Mexican food in Los Angeles.”
Tomas Martinez of Tacos Tumbras | Samanta Helou Hernandez Grand Central Market
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

Get to Know the People Behind the Grand Central Market Counters

Grand Central Market has been open for a century. Those who shop there have found sustenance, but for industrious immigrants, working at the market is also a way to stay in touch with and share their culture.
La Cita Sign with LA skyscraper in the back: Mexican flag, ":Cocktails," "Dancing" | Samanta Helou
Article
The Migrant Kitchen

How Mexican-Themed Bar La Cita Bridges L.A.'s Diverse Communities

For more than 60 years, La Cita bar has wrapped its arms around a diverse set of the city’s residents — from recent Central American immigrants to second generation Chicanx feminists — making people feel at home amid its red tiles and sparkling lights.
Active loading indicator