6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
Earth Focus

Earth Focus

Start watching
5LQmQJY-show-poster2x3-MRWBpAK.jpg

Reporter Roundup

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

Gray Wolves in California: A Timeline

Gray Wolf in Snow
Support Provided By
or-7.jpg
OR-7, a.k.a. "Journey," a.k.a. the first wolf to visit California in 89 years. | Photo: USFWS

Love 'em or loathe 'em, gray wolves are coming back to California. The gregarious predators are reoccupying habitat from which 19th and 20th century Californians displaced them, and that's inspiring admiration among wolf fans worldwide.

It's not that wolves are universally popular across the board in the Golden State. Ranchers and farmers who raise livestock in potential wolf habitat are wary of the wolves reinhabiting the state, and that's not hard to understand. As the state's wolf population grows little by little, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife is crafting a wolf management plan for the state, which will set policy for how to handle the probably inevitable conflicts between wolves and stock growers. A workable policy will go a long way toward reducing resentment of gray wolves in California.

It's probably safe to say, however, that the majority of Californians are very much in favor of our state's new canine residents. After decades of news of environmental loss coming over the airwaves and the net like a constant drumbeat, there's just something about California's new wolves that feels like taking a deep breath. We constantly hear about one species after another declining or going extinct. Even the relative success stories, like the continuing existence of the California condor, come only after a massive investment in .recovery programs.

Meanwhile, wolves voluntarily walk hundreds of miles from Idaho to reintroduce themselves to the state of California, and all we need to do to help them along is to avoid shooting them.

At this writing, California has two documented wolf packs. That will almost certainly change, and soon. In 2011, California had one wild gray wolf that visited occasionally. Between the state's two current packs, the state now has nine wolves. Those two packs could add as many as a dozen more wolves to the state's roster by 2017's spring denning season even if no more wolves wander in from Oregon or Nevada.

or-7-pup-11-7-16.jpg
Trail camera image of a young member of the Rogue Pack | Photo: Oregon DFW

It's going to be hard to keep up. That's why we've put together this interactive timeline of gray wolves in California, which we'll be updating as more wolf news happens. You can bookmark this page, or just check our news stories about wolves: we'll be embedding the continually updated timeline in the stories that make up our ongoing gray wolf coverage. 

Support Provided By
Read More
A nurse in blue personal protective gear administers the Moderna Covid-19 vaccine to a woman in a red shirt.

How to Schedule Your COVID-19 Vaccine Appointment in Southern California

Booking an appointment for your free COVID-19 vaccine is complicated. To keep track of all the moving parts, LAist reached out to cities and counties in the greater Los Angeles area for specifics. Find your location below for your guide to booking vaccine appointments in Southern California.
A person in a red sweatshirt administers COVID-19 vaccine to a young Black man. Both are wearing face masks.

State Sets Aside Vaccines for Hard-Hit Areas, Speeds Reopening Efforts

Southern California counties and others across the state could be cleared to open more businesses and lift other restrictions sooner than anticipated under a plan announced today that will prioritize COVID-19 vaccines in communities hardest hit by the pandemic.
A health care worker prepares a dose of China's Sinovac Biotech vaccine for the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), during a mass vaccination for vendors at the Tanah Abang textile market in Jakarta, Indonesia, February 17, 2021.

Jakarta Will Fine People Who Refuse COVID-19 Vaccines. Will It Work?

The city of Jakarta has taken the rare step of announcing fines and welfare penalties for anyone who refuses to get a COVID-19 vaccine, raising fears of inequalities