Indigenous Art of California

Armand | Date Farmers

November is Native American Heritage month, and today, Artbound highlights indigenous artwork from the Golden State. From an exhibition that challenged the portrayal of American Indians in popular culture to a profile on a radio program making a splash on the airwaves, we present five features that explore the past, present, and future of native cultures.




Tomahawks and Tipis: Native American Representations in Commercial Culture

An exhibition rich in humor and optimism, "Where Are the Tipis? Changing Perceptions About Indians" dispels stereotypes long-used by the media.



Matthew Leivas, Sr, Chemehuevi Indian of the Chemeheuvi Reservation, California,-thumb-580x433-28654-thumb-580x433-28655

Salt Songs to Break Your Heart

On a bright day in Twentynine Palms, Chemehuevi Indian Salt Song singer Matthew Leivas invoked the memory of native people who came before.




On the Air with Indian Time Radio

For over 20 years, KUCR Indian Time Radio has been a point of pride in the Indian community, cementing their own place within Southern California's pop culture sphere.



La Pantera_72-thumb-600x621-28065

Date Farmers: Desert Detritus Becomes Chicano Pop Art

The Date Farmers make Chicano pop art; they are desert Rauschenbergs, infusing abstract expressionism with a politically charged, pop culture update.




Gerald Clarke Jr.: The Contemporary Indian Experience Through Art

Gerald Clarke Jr. refuses to be defined like an artifact on a museum shelf by his Indian heritage. He seeks to let the past inform the present, but not restrict it.


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