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Centro De Arte Publico

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By 1976, Corazon Productions splintered in the aftermath of the end of Carlos Almaraz and Patricia Parra's relationship. In 1977 Almaraz, along with Guillermo Bejarano and Richard Duardo, founded the Centro de Arte Publico on 56th and Figueroa in Highland Park. Almaraz and Bejerano had been Highland Park residents for several years and Duardo, a UCLA graduate and former printer for Self Help Graphics, had grown up in the area after his family moved there in the 1950s. For Duardo, the Centro was the first of many design studios he would develop over his career. John Valadez, a painter and muralist, also became involved, producing works that focused on Los Angeles street scenes and urban Chicana/o youth.

Barbara Carrasco standing next to her print 'Self-Portrait' made in 1984
Barbara Carrasco standing next to her print 'Self-Portrait' made in 1984

A number of women were invited to participate in the Centro, which reflected a growing concern for gender equality in the art community and the country as a whole. Barbara Carrasco, Dolores Cruz and Judithe Hernandez were among the artists informed by a burgeoning Chicana feminist agenda, experimenting and developing a uniquely Chicana feminist iconography.

Photo courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barbara


El Centro
Richard Duardo likens the Centro to the missions established throughout California - a safe harbor for like-minded artists to gather and collaborate.


Establishing the Center
Guillermo Bejarano describes the beginnings of the Centro de Arte Publico in Highland Park, which evolved from Corazon Productions with Carlos Almaraz.


An Evolution from Los Four
Judithe Hernandez was the fifth member of Los Four, which acted as a springboard for the cultivation of other artist collectives
throughout the country.


The Last Days
Lack of support and recognition led to the closing of the Centro and the studio's transformation into a more inclusive space where everyone fed off the energy of others.

Painting the Walls 1
Los Four - from left, Beto De La Rocha, Carlos Almaraz, Frank Romero, Judithe Hernandez, 1974. |  Image courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barabara
Painting the Walls 2
The Broadway Mural by John Valadez inside Victor Clothing Co. on Broadway, Los Angeles, 1981. |  Image courtesy of the Los Angeles Public Library
Painting the Walls 3
Visiting artist John Valadez at Self Help Graphics & Art, 1986. |  Image courtesy of Self-Help Graphics/CEMA UC Santa Barbara
Painting the Walls 4
The owners of Victor Clothing Company commissioned artists to create murals on and inside their building on Broadway. Left, Nino y Caballo by Frank Romero, 1984; Right, The Pope of Broadway by Eloy Torrez, 1985. |  Image courtesy of the Los Angeles Public LIbrary
Painting the Walls 5
Murals of Aztlan was created on the walls at the Craft and Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles. Artists involved included Carlos Almaraz, Frank Romero, John Valadez, Wayne Healy, and Judithe Hernandez. This portion was painted by Carlos Almaraz, 1981. |  Image courtesy of the Los Angeles Public LIbrary
Painting the Walls 6
John Valadez touching up a section of Murals of Aztlan, 1981. |  Image courtesy of the Los Angeles Public LIbrary
Painting the Walls 7
Multi-Cultural Program at Self Help Graphics & Art, 1980. |  Image courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barabara
Painting the Walls 8
Untitled by Richard Duardo, 1985. |  Image courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barabara
Painting the Walls 9
Negativity Attracts by Barbara Carrasco, 1990. |  Image courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barabara
Painting the Walls 10
Leo Limon with his print La Crusada (sic), 1991. |  Image courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barabara
Painting the Walls 11
Tierra y Libertad by Wayne Healy, 1998. |  Image courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barabara
Painting the Walls 12
Dolores, Screenprint, Barbara Carrasco, 1999. |  Image courtesy of Self Help Graphics & Art/CEMA UC Santa Barabara
Painting the Walls 13
Sonya Fe, 2011.
Painting the Walls 14
Guillermo Bejarano, 2011.
Painting the Walls 15
Judithe Hernandez, 2011.

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