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Artbound

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710 Corridor
This is part of a series examining the 710 Corridor and its impact in the surrounding communities, produced in partnership with the California Endowment.

 The I-710 Corridor Project, considered the largest infrastructure project in the nation, is a modernization of the freeway stretching from the ports of Long Beach and Los Angeles to the 60 Freeway. With the expanding global economy and growing impact of truck traffic on an aging freeway system, the need to improve existing infrastructure is crucial. The 710 freeway is the backbone of Southern California commerce, as trucks travel from the ports to warehouses, rail yards, and intermodal transportation centers to distribute goods across the country.

Once named the Los Angeles River Freeway, the 710 Freeway extends the length of the river, through 15 cities and unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County. Communities along the 18-mile stretch are already heavily impacted by the congestion, with asthma rates twice the normal, and cancer risk rates 20 times higher than the federal average according to the California Air Resources Board. Plans to improve the infrastructure range from improving its current state, to expanding lanes from 8 to 16 with dedicated lanes for truck traffic.

While planners are seeking community engagement throughout the planning process, community organizations are also taking it upon themselves to ensure that their voices are heard.
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