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The Los Angeles State Historic Park

In 2005, a 32-acre industrial brown field in Chinatown became a locus for political infighting and intrigue between local real estate developers, community activists and artists, each group claiming the land in the name of a different vision and use. One such vision was the Not a Cornfield Project, created by Farmlab as an investigation on land use, which turned the 32-acres into a cornfield for one full growth cycle. Today, the lot houses the Los Angeles State Historic Park, which has 13-acres for public use at the southern end, until a formal design for a city park is completed and approved in full.

 


A State Park for Los Angeles
Sean Woods, Superintendent for the Los Angeles State Parks, discusses the development of the Los Angeles State Historic Park and its growth out of environmental movements, government support and community involvement

 


The Ellis Island of Los Angeles
Sean Woods, Superintendent for the Los Angeles State Parks, explains the L.A. Historic Park's nickname of the Ellis Island of Los Angeles

 


Not a Cornfield
Lauren Bon, the artist behind the Not a Cornfield Project, describes how the idea for the project evolved.

 

Layers of Culture
Mark Acuña, a member of the Gabrielino Tongva Tribe, believes the LA State Historic Park can transform the LA River's reputation as a concrete ditch.