Key Art of "Summer of Rockets" featuring Keeley Hawes and Toby Stephens.

Summer of Rockets

Start watching
6HWbNHN-show-poster2x3-c7tgE2Y.png

Artbound

Start watching
FZG3mkG-show-poster2x3-nOossfs.png

SoCal Update

Start watching
Death in Paradise Series 10

Death in Paradise

Start watching
millionaire still

KCET Must See Movies

Start watching
MZihTLV-show-poster2x3-5CKaGu8.jpg

Independent Lens

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
HvlSxHY-show-poster2x3-4ik43uV.png

Earth Focus

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.

Venice Pavilion

Support Provided By

The Venice Pavilion, originally built as recreation facility in the 1960's has played a multitude of roles based on its many contributing forces. For graffiti artists - walls, for musicians - a stage, for the homeless - shelter, and for skaters, a playground. The concrete amphitheater was criticized for blocking the view of the ocean and others felt it was built for hiding a derelict oil well. It was ignored by the city and overtime fell into disrepair. Its tear-down began in 2000, but as the city ran out of money the rubble became a mainstay of the beach, later buried under the sand. Remnants of the walls next to the skate park exist now almost as a reminder of the many layers of Venice's history.


The Pavilion
"In 1959 the recreation and parks department wanted to help revitalize Venice. In 1962, they said all the buildings west of the boardwalk had to be torn down."


The Walls
"In 1999, the city had the opportunity to remodel the entire ocean front walk. The area was remodeled and the California Coast Commission said that in order to tear down the pavilion, you had to save a portion of the walls as a memorial to the graffiti."

Support Provided By
Read More
Ed Fuentes, artwork Colette Miller (preview)

In Remembrance of Arts Journalist and Advocate Ed Fuentes

Collaborator and friend James Daichendt remembers Ed Fuentes, a longtime advocate of the arts, who passed away this week.
mount_baldy_photo_by_daniel_medina

The San Gabriels: The Remarkable History of L.A.'s Threatened National Monument

An exploration of the rich history and culture of the San Gabriel Mountains and its eponymous river.
Boyle Heights Street Vending. Credits: Feng Yuan

Is Los Angeles Finally Legalizing Street Vending?

Trend-setting entrepreneurs versus “illegal” street vendors is a confusing dichotomy that has become the center of many conversations.