Muhammad Ali

Muhammad Ali

Start watching
Fine Cut

Fine Cut

Start watching
SoCal Update

SoCal Update

Start watching
a large damn with graffiti of a woman with a hammer on it, mountains in the background

Earth Focus Presents

Start watching
Southland Sessions

Southland Sessions

Start watching
Professor T

Professor T (Belgium)

Start watching
Artbound

Artbound

Start watching
Emma

Emma

Start watching
Guilt

Guilt

Start watching
Line of Separation Key Art.

Line of Separation

Start watching
Us

Us

Start watching
The Latino Experience

The Latino Experience

Start watching
Key Art of "Summer of Rockets" featuring Keeley Hawes and Toby Stephens.

Summer of Rockets

Start watching
Death in Paradise Series 10

Death in Paradise

Start watching
millionaire still

KCET Must See Movies

Start watching
Independent Lens

Independent Lens

Start watching
MJ250sC-show-poster2x3-Bflky7i.png

Tending Nature

Start watching
Earth Focus

Earth Focus

Start watching
City Rising

City Rising

Start watching
Lost LA

Lost LA

Start watching
Member
Your donation supports our high-quality, inspiring and commercial-free programming.
Support Icon
Learn about the many ways to support KCET.
Support Icon
Contact our Leadership, Advancement, Membership and Special Events teams.
Lost LA

Hanging Trees: The Untold Story of Lynching in California

What do Southern California’s hanging trees say about the region’s attitudes toward its bloody past? Some actual hanging trees survive, albeit in obscurity, like the oak in Orange County where Andres Pico’s posse hung two desperadoes from Juan Flores’ gang. But others of more dubious historicity, like the “Hangman’s Tree” in Knott’s Berry Farm, seem to romanticize a period marked by great violence and ethnic strife; Los Angeles’ homicide rate of 1,240 per 100,000 in the 1850s is the highest ever reported in U.S. history, and much of the violence had racial dimensions. How can we separate the history from the legend?

Read more
Support Provided By
Full Episodes
Season
Shindana Dolls | Still from "Lost LA" S4 E6: Shindana Toy Company
Episode
26:40
Lost LA

Shindana Toy Company - Changing the American Doll Industry

Explore the lasting impact of the Shindana Toy Company, created out of the need for community empowerment following the 1965 Watts uprising, whose ethnically correct black dolls forever changed the American doll industry.
Mount Wilson Observatory | Image from "Lost LA" S4 E5: Discovering the Universe
Episode
24:52
Lost LA

Discovering the Universe - Exploring the Cosmos Atop Mount Wilson

As recently as a century ago, scientists doubted whether the universe extended beyond our own Milky Way — until astronomer Edwin Hubble, working with the world’s most powerful telescope discovered just how vast the universe is.
Paul Revere Williams opposite a man explaining a project | Courtesy of J. Paul Getty Trust. Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles
Episode
26:17
Lost LA

Paul Revere Williams - An African-American Architect in Jet-Age L.A.

Although best known for designing the homes of celebrities like Lucille Ball and Frank Sinatra, the pioneering African-American architect Paul Revere Williams also contributed to some of the city’ s most recognizable civic structures.
Men and women toasting farewell to the 18th Amendment during Prohibition | Los Angeles Examiner Photographs Collection,University of Southern California Libraries
Episode
26:40
Lost LA

Bootlegger Tunnels - A Journey Through LA’s Prohibition Lore

Prohibition may have outlawed liquor, but that didn’t mean the booze stopped flowing. Explore the myths of subterranean Los Angeles, crawl through prohibition-era tunnels, and visit some of the city’s oldest speakeasies.
A Monument in the Cemetery at Manzanar Relocation Center | Ansel Adams, Courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division
Episode
26:40
Lost LA

Three Views of Manzanar - Ansel Adams, Dorothea Lange and Toyo Miyatake

During World War II, three renowned photographers captured scenes from the Japanese incarceration: outsiders Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams and incarceree Tōyō Miyatake who boldly smuggled in a camera lens to document life from within the camp.