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Fantastic! — L.A.’s Architecture of Dreams

Architect Robert V. Derrah remodeled the Coca-Cola Building, located at 1334 South Central Avenue, into a streamlined ocean liner in 1936 | National Park Service
Architect Robert V. Derrah remodeled the Coca-Cola Building, located at 1334 South Central Avenue, into a streamlined ocean liner in 1936 | National Park Service | National Park Service
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The Coffee Cup Café was located at 8901 Pico Boulevard | Photograph courtesy of Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library
The Coffee Cup Café was located at 8901 Pico Boulevard | Photograph courtesy of Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library

Once upon a time in Los Angeles, you could get a hot dog from a hot dog and a tamale inside a tamale. You could get a bowl of chili while sitting in a chili bowl, a cup of coffee beneath a coffee cup, and a mug of beer in a beer keg. The buildings where hot dogs, tamales, and the rest were sold looked like those things but were cartoonishly huge, as if made for the use of giants.

Buildings that imitate the things sold inside are called mimetic architecture. There were several mimetic buildings in Los Angeles from 1920 through the 1940s, from a camera store that looked like a camera and a piano store shaped like a piano, to a flower shop in the form of a flowerpot.

Not all the exuberant commercial architecture was an oversize image of what was inside. Igloos and icebergs sold ice cream. Snowcapped mountains housed a bar. Windmills advertised baked goods. An oil derrick dispensed motor oil, but an oilcan served hamburgers. Bacon and eggs were logically dished inside a stucco pig, but hamburgers were on the menu inside big dogs and toads.

Chinese shrines, Art Deco ziggurats, and domed mosques pumped gasoline for Gilmore, Signal and Violet Ray. The wings of a Fokker F-32 airliner, improbably parked at the corner of Wilshire Boulevard and Cochran Avenue, shaded the gas pumps of Bob’s Airmail Service Station. The Sphinx Realty Company was a (sort of) sphinx. A steamship was (and still is) the Coca-Cola bottling plant in Los Angeles. The Brown Derby on Wilshire Boulevard was an enormous brown derby hat. The name of the restaurant was simply the restaurant.

Material dreams like the imitative Tail o' the Pup and the symbolic Coca-Cola Building are collectively called programmatic architecture, where form willfully ignores function. Predictably, Hollywood played a role in making it part of fantasy Los Angeles.

Spectacle and Sham

The Sphinx Realty Company was located at 537 N. Fairfax Avenue | Photograph courtesy of Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library
The Sphinx Realty Company was located at 537 N. Fairfax Avenue | Photograph courtesy of Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library

In 1915, following the success of “The Birth of a Nation,” director D. W. Griffith planned his next movie on an even grander scale. Griffith’s “Intolerance” would show “Love's Struggle Throughout the Ages” with all the melodrama and sentimentality he could fit into the film’s three and a half hours. For scenes set in ancient Babylon, Griffith ordered two rows of 50-foot pillars topped by gigantic rearing elephants. More elephants guarded city gates, 136 feet tall and pattered with ornamental crests and frescoed gods. The decaying plaster and plywood set loomed over the intersection of Sunset and Hollywood boulevards until 1919 when the Los Angeles Fire Department ordered its demolition.

Hoot Hoot I Scream was moved to 8711 Long Beach Boulevard and became the Hoot Owl Café. Its head swiveled, and its eyes (made from automobile headlamps) blinked | Photograph courtesy of Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library
Hoot Hoot I Scream was moved to 8711 Long Beach Boulevard and became the Hoot Owl Café. Its head swiveled, and its eyes (made from automobile headlamps) blinked | Photograph courtesy of Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library

Jim Heimann, who has documented California’s unrestrained programmatic architecture in several books, dates its beginning in Los Angeles to the lingering spectacle of Griffith’s Babylon set. But there were other precedents. Buildings in the amusement zone at San Diego’s Panama-California Exposition in 1915 looked like toadstools and pagodas made of plaster, fiber and chicken wire. That same year, San Francisco’s similarly named Panama-Pacific International Exposition had a 120-foot figure of Buddha, an enormous Uncle Sam and a two-story horse. Griffith was impressed and brought some of the fair’s craftsmen to Hollywood to build the “Intolerance” sets.

By the early 1920s, local builders had the skills to sculpt plaster, stucco, wood, and wire into eye-catching storefronts. Los Angeles had the perpetual good weather and a mobile population eager to see the sights from the era’s open automobiles. Business operators had embraced the advertising value of architecture to attract novelty-seeking customers. Sun, speed, wide vistas, and post-war optimism built fakery into the fabric of Los Angeles and into the city’s mythology of itself.

When Claes Oldenburg and Coosje van Bruggen designed a titanic pair of binoculars as the portal to the Chiat/Day Building in Venice in 1991, they were having postmodern fun with the history of shape-shifting Los Angeles architecture. But the taste for dreamscapes went deeper than novelty buildings.

Dream Homes

Wallace Neff and other architects in the 1920s designed spacious homes in Pasadena and San Marino in the new Spanish Colonial Revival style. They agreed with San Diego architect Richard Requa, who argued, “the logical, fitting and altogether appropriate architecture for California… is a style inspired and suggested” by Spain and colonial Mexico.[i] In the style’s cheerful disregard for authenticity and in its creation of a past that ought to have been, the Spanish Colonial Revival prefigured the theme park designs of Disneyland, Knott’s Berry Farm, and Universal Studios Hollywood.

This Van de Kamp coffee shop was on the corner of Fletcher Drive and San Fernando Road. At the company’s height, 320 bakeries and coffee shops beckoned passersby with large windmills | Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library
This Van de Kamp coffee shop was on the corner of Fletcher Drive and San Fernando Road. At the company’s height, 320 bakeries and coffee shops beckoned passersby with large windmills | Security Pacific National Bank Collection, Los Angeles Public Library

Developers in Southern California eventually laid out entire cities — or “themed communities” — in the style. Santa Barbara and Ojai remade themselves in white stucco, red tile and wrought iron. Rancho Santa Fe in San Diego County was newly built beginning in 1921 as a hybrid of Navajo pueblo and Mexican colonial village.

Randy's Donuts, located at 805 W. Manchester Boulevard, isn’t programmatic architecture, but its oversized signage makes it a memorable commercial landmark | Photograph courtesy of Herald Examiner Collection, Los Angeles Public Library
Randy's Donuts, located at 805 W. Manchester Boulevard, isn’t programmatic architecture, but its oversized signage makes it a memorable commercial landmark | Photograph courtesy of Herald Examiner Collection, Los Angeles Public Library

The Spanish Colonial Revival answered the longing of well-to-do homeowners who wanted to be connected to the essence of Southern California, even if that connection was a sham. In the deliberate conflation of place and dwelling, architects and their clients sought a new kind of California domesticity that was intended to redeem modern life from haste and monotony. The Great Depression ended that project, and the Revival style had a diminished afterlife as a sketchy stucco box with red tile trim, a flat roof and a cement figure of a sleeping Mexican on the porch.

What made it possible to build that kind of house was the climate that suggested the style. Houses in Los Angeles need only enough bracing to shed occasional rain, not bear the load of a long winter’s snowfall and ice storms. Liberated from stone, brick and a pitched roof, a house in Los Angeles could be anything from a storybook “Hansel and Gretel” cottage, like the Willat/Spadena House, to a docked UFO, like the Chemosphere.

The boisterous architectural freedom that Angeleños embraced propped up a long-lasting cultural critique of Los Angeles, as in the opening pages of Nathanael West’s “The Day of the Locust:”[ii]

"(N)ot even the soft wash of dusk could help the houses. Only dynamite would be of any use against the Mexican ranch houses, Samoan huts, Mediterranean villas, Egyptian and Japanese temples, Swiss chalets, Tudor cottages, and every possible combination of these styles that lined the slopes of the canyon… On the corner of La Huerta Road was a miniature Rhine castle with tarpaper turrets pierced for archers. Next to it was a little highly colored shack with domes and minarets out of the Arabian Nights… It is hard to laugh at the need for beauty and romance, no matter how tasteless, even horrible, the results of that are."

Objections to the inauthenticity of Los Angeles mistook what was fundamental about the city, that it was historically and geographically distinct from other places in America. Traditional building styles, such as a department store decorated like a Venetian palazzo or a bank that looked like a Roman temple, were as inauthentic in Los Angeles as a tire plant in the form of an Assyrian fortress or an apartment building that looked like the bridge of an ocean liner.

Fantasylands

The Hollywood & Highland shopping and theater complex is built around full-size replicas from D. W. Griffith’s 1915 Babylon set | Photo by Woo from Irvine, courtesy of Wikimedia