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Funders for Lost LA

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Logos for California Humanities, California State Library, Union Bank, and The Ralph M. Parson's Foundation

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Drawings of Lowe Planet Airship from the 1910 booklet "The Latest Development in Aerial Navigation"

The Man Who Almost Conquered L.A.'s Skies

In the late 1800s, Thaddeus Sobieski Constantine Lowe dreamed of a luxury airship that would conquer the skies. But what Lowe had in ambition he lacked in financial investment.
An archival black and white photo of a San Gabriel Timberland Reserve ranger sitting atop a mule. He's wearing a collared long sleeve shirt and a wide-brim hat. The insignia on his collar reads, "S.G.R.," which stands for San Gabriel Reserve. The ranger and the mule stand among trees.

How California Got Its First National Forest

In the late 1800s, logging and grazing in the San Gabriel Mountains threatened the irrigation-based societies in the valley. President Harrison had a solution. Reserving 555,520 acres of the San Gabriel Mountains, effectively creating Angeles National Forest.
An archival black-and-white photo of a man kneeled with his hand on a vintage car.

When L.A. Drove in the Dark: SoCal During World War II

At the height of World War II, Southern Californians navigated nights in complete darkness as defense authorities imposed severe dimout restrictions on the region, ordering residents to turn of all lights that could be seen from sea at night.